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infinitive or present continuous? Options
robjen
Posted: Saturday, June 9, 2018 3:55:56 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/17/2015
Posts: 577
Neurons: 3,226
I have made up four pairs of sentences below.

(1a) It's nice to work with you.
(1b) It's nice working with you.

(2a) It's a pleasure to work with you.
(2b) It's a pleasure working with you.

(3a) There are lots of public events to celebrate the king's birthday.
(3b) There are lots of public events celebrating the king's birthday.

(4a) There will be ten people to join our club soon.
(4b) There will be ten people joining our club soon.


I have heard both forms of verbs used in everyday conversation. Which form is grammatically correct?

Thanks a lot.
ChrisKC
Posted: Saturday, June 9, 2018 11:23:59 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/27/2014
Posts: 274
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Location: Chiang Mai, Chiang Mai, Thailand
I have little quarrel with any of your suggestions, though I slightly prefer the "b" options

In number 4, though not incorrect, I prefer to omit the "will be", as "soon" at the end, strongly suggests 'will be' - but it is a small point.

Another option is "There are ten people joining our club soon".


For the teachers out there:

When talking about "our" (my) club or country, or company, shouldn't those be capitalised? i.e. because they become Proper Nouns?
NKM
Posted: Saturday, June 9, 2018 11:47:23 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 4,866
Neurons: 263,920
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
robjen wrote:
I have made up four pairs of sentences below.

(1a) It's nice to work with you.
(1b) It's nice working with you.

(2a) It's a pleasure to work with you.
(2b) It's a pleasure working with you.

(3a) There are lots of public events to celebrate the king's birthday.
(3b) There are lots of public events celebrating the king's birthday.

(4a) There will be ten people to join our club soon.
(4b) There will be ten people joining our club soon.


I have heard both forms of verbs used in everyday conversation. Which form is grammatically correct?

Thanks a lot.

══════════════════════════════════════════════

Only sentence (4a) seems questionable, in that it just doesn't seem like the way anybody would say it. 
"There are ten people [who are] expected to join our club soon."



Sometimes using the participle feels more "matter of fact"; using the infinitive could seem to suggest that there's something left unsaid.
— "It's nice to work with you." (instead of just watching, or trying to do it myself?)
— "It's a pleasure to work with you." (instead of arguing about how to do it?)


Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, June 10, 2018 4:18:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,894
Neurons: 173,985
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I agree with Chris and NKM - sentence 4a just doesn't sound right. Also 4b would normally be worded differently.
"Ten people are joining our club soon."
"Ten people will be joining our club soon."

***********
Hi Chris. I think possibly Americans capitalise "My Country" - but not "my club".

We don't do that in Britain.
We capitalise Britain, the UK, England, Scotland, Great Britain, the British Isles etc, but not "my country".

*************
My explanation of the difference between the infinitive and the participle is this (#4 is different):

The participle (because it can be considered part of the progressive form of the verb) is used to express what is happening NOW (in 1, 2 and 3).
"I am working with you right now, and it's nice."

The infinitive is timeless, it applies to past, present and future - or any one or two of them.
The time-frame is supplied by context, and by the 'background knowledge' of the two people in the conversation.

"It's nice to work with you." can mean "I enjoyed working with you last week, and look forward to working with you again."
Or it can mean "I enjoyed working with you each time I did so in the past, and I'm enjoying it right now."

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
#4 is not the same form of sentence at all.
It is a future-tense sentence, so the infinitive is not a choice.

(4a) There will be ten people to join our club soon.
(4c) Ten people will be to join our club soon.

(4b) There will be ten people joining our club soon.
(4c) Ten people will be joining our club soon.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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