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someone who looked like you Options
onsen
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2018 7:56:44 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/14/2017
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Hello,

Daughter: I saw someone who looked like you at the station on my way home.
Mother: Someone who looked like me?
D: Yes.
(a self-made conversation)

Q1
Can the following phrases be used in place of the phrase 'someone who looked like you'?
1. someone who could pass for you
2. someone (just/exactly) like you
3. someone (just/exactly) looking like you
4. someone similar to you
5. your lookalike

Q2
Is there any noun phrase consisting of the construction 'someone + adjective + preposition + you' which serves as a substitute for 'someone who looked like you'?

Thank you
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2018 8:59:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi onsen.
That's quite a few questions . . .

1.1 - "someone who could pass for you" seems grammatical, but it sounds 'odd'.
1.2a - "someone just like you" is grammatical and quite natural. It doesn't mean exactly the same. "Someone who looks like you" is physically similar. "Someone just like you" acts and speaks the same way too.
1.2b - "someone exactly like you" is grammatical and quite natural. It doesn't mean the same. "Someone who looks like you" is physically similar. "Someone exactly like you" looks, acts and speaks the same way to such an extent that one would mistake the two people for each other.
1.3 - "someone (just/exactly) looking like you" does not work. "Just/exactly" modifies 'like', so should be connected to it.
"someone looking (just/exactly) like you" would work. It (again) doesn't mean exactly the same.
"Who looks like you" refers to the normal physical features of the person. She is a "twin" or very similar-looking person. Her normal 'look' is the same as the mother's.
"Looking like you" refers to the person's actions/appearance at the time (the time she was at the station) - it may not be a normal resemblance. She may have been wearing make-up and a disguise in order to look similar to the mother.
1.4 - "someone similar to you" is OK - it would be used when the similarity was slight (not enough to say 'looked like').
1.5 - I suppose it's grammatically OK. I don't think I've ever heard anyone use the word 'lookalike' in real life.

2. It depends what you are expecting. There is no adjective which means "who looked like".
"I saw someone tall like you."
"I saw someone blonde like you."
"I saw someone similar to you."
"I saw someone almost identical to you."



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2018 9:27:03 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
There is the noun doppelgänger which has been borrowed from the German language.

"I saw your doppelgänger today."



I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2018 9:46:36 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,894
Neurons: 173,985
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
That's true - I didn't think of that.

You do hear "lookalike", but usually as part of a combination-noun.

I saw a Beyoncé-lookalike today.
Did you see the Paul McCartney-lookalike in the club last night?


There are, of course, many idiomatic phrases and slang forms one could use.

"I saw the spitting image of you at the station on my way home."
"I saw a dead ringer for you at the station on my way home."




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
TMe
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2018 11:25:26 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/12/2017
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Neurons: 4,943
Onsen, what you have written is perfectly correct. IMO

Some members may try to find fault and interpret in their own way.

TFD;

lookalike
ˈlʊkəlʌɪk/Submit
noun
a person or thing that closely resembles another, especially someone who looks very similar to a famous person.
"an Elvis Presley lookalike"
synonyms: double, twin, exact likeness, image, living image, mirror image, exact match, replica, clone, imitation, duplicate, copy, facsimile;


I am a layman.
Hope123
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2018 1:57:42 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/23/2015
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Location: Burlington, Ontario, Canada
TMe wrote:


Some members may try to find fault and interpret in their own way.



Huh?

Elitism is the slur directed at merit by mediocrity. -Sydney J. Harris, journalist (14 Sep 1917-1986)
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2018 2:15:16 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
I saw your doppelganger at the station today.
NKM
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2018 5:22:35 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
In case the resemblance was close but not quite exact, you might say "I saw someone who looked a lot like you."

(That would be more natural than "similar to you.")

Also, "your double" (or "someone who could be your double") is probably more common than "your doppelgänger".

Romany
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2018 6:58:14 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,328
Neurons: 44,556
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

I don't think anyone would bother telling someone this.Think It's meaningless. We're all "similar". The basic model is two legs/arms, a head, a torso, hands and feet.

So I'd imagine that only if we were speaking to someone from a far-distant nebula would would one remark on "similarity"? Or if they had some loathsome deformity. And in that context we'd not use it anyway.d'oh!

NK, for me, almost everyone I know would use "doppelganger". If for no other reason than that anyone under around 30 (here at least) was brought up on a diet of the supernatural, both on tv and in movies; as well as through manga, graphic novels, and comics. In books too, but books now in the popular market; not just through the Classics.

People around me are pretty familiar with dopplegangers, and nosferatu, and concepts once only primarily available through The Canon.

It tickles me pink!Dancing
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