The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

leaning cop Options
vkhu
Posted: Saturday, June 2, 2018 10:54:08 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/18/2012
Posts: 782
Neurons: 6,168
Quote:
Eamon stopped by. He stopped by a lot, happily played the role of leaning cop, drinking coffee.

Context: Eamon is a police officer, stopping by his adopted brother's bike shop. These two are very close. This is just a social call, and Eamon isn't investigating a case or anything like that.

I don't get what a "leaning cop" is. It doesn't sound like Eamon is physically leaning against something, and Google, as reliable as ever in such matters, could find nothing on it. Is this a police slang of some kind?
Romany
Posted: Saturday, June 2, 2018 12:01:23 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,079
Neurons: 43,425
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
I'd think he meant that Eamon didn't want to put off people by thinking his brother's shop is patrolled by police. So he just leaned against the wall, sipping his coffee to show it was just a sociable visit.
vkhu
Posted: Saturday, June 2, 2018 12:10:03 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/18/2012
Posts: 782
Neurons: 6,168
I'm still a bit on the fence about this. From the excerpt, Eamon seemes to do the "leaning cop" routine a lot. Then does that mean he always leans against something every time he visits the shop?
leonAzul
Posted: Sunday, June 3, 2018 5:09:29 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,312
Neurons: 26,413
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
vkhu wrote:
I'm still a bit on the fence about this. From the excerpt, Eamon seemes to do the "leaning cop" routine a lot. Then does that mean he always leans against something every time he visits the shop?


There is a stereotype of police officers on foot patrol (cops on the beat) spending most of their time drinking coffee and eating baked goods, especially donuts. As others have already suggested, this gives the image of a casual visit rather than an active investigation.

Yet the the author also describes this as a "role". This suggests to me that some special attention is involved contrary to appearances, perhaps even special protection. My opinion is that this is intended to raise questions, and the reader is supposed to look for the answers as the story unfolds.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.