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teachersalah
Posted: Friday, May 25, 2018 5:16:49 PM
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Joined: 5/23/2018
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I didnt come to understand the following
Every task in the physical exam required effort on my part, and I couldnt help but think about what it might be like to do to them with less-abled body.
what is the meaning of the work in bold, does it means disabled?
NKM
Posted: Friday, May 25, 2018 8:23:13 PM

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Joined: 2/14/2015
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teachersalah wrote:
I didnt come to understand the following
Every task in the physical exam required effort on my part, and I couldnt help but think about what it might be like to do to them with less-abled body.
what is the meaning of the work in bold, does it means disabled?

══════════════════════════════════════════════

I've never heard of "less-abled", but I suppose it might have been intended as a reference to "a body less able than mine."

Even that, though, seems awkward at best. We don't normally speak of a body as being "able" except in the adjective "able-bodied".

"Every task in the physical exam required effort on my part, and I couldn't help but think about what it might be like to do to them with a less than healthy body."

mactoria
Posted: Friday, May 25, 2018 10:08:10 PM
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Location: Stockton, California, United States
teachersalah: you didn't give the origin of the sentence you quoted, or whether it was from just a regular person or from a representative/organization of persons with disabilities. I did a quick Google search for the phrase "less-abled" and came up with several listings that included the term "less-abled" (many from the UK, some from the US). In the main, these were from organizations or blogs representing various disabilities or dictionary/thesaurus sites. None of those that I read supported the use of the phrase "less-abled" as a descriptor for a person who has a disability or some kind of condition that makes a person unable or less able to do something. It's not a recognized term for persons with disabling medical or physical conditions as far as I can see. Like NKM, I've never heard or seen anyone use "less-abled" as a term. However, in the sentence you quoted from, I'd agree that it means something along the lines of 'a person who is less able to do something than me.'

I worked with persons with developmental disabilities for 3 decades. How people with developmental/medical/physical impairments like to be described varies a great deal, but in general most people would prefer not to have a term like "less-able" or "differently-able" used to describe them; if a term had to be used, just plain old "disabled" would probably offend the fewest people these days in the US. Mostly people want not to be labelled by something they don't have or can't do. However, if the sentence you quoted from just had to be said/written, I'd suggest the more acceptable way would be something like "...might like to do them if I were less able..." or " "might be like to do them if I had a physical impairment."
palapaguy
Posted: Friday, May 25, 2018 11:34:40 PM

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teachersalah wrote:
I didnt come to understand the following
Every task in the physical exam required effort on my part, and I couldnt help but think about what it might be like to do to them with less-abled body.
what is the meaning of the work in bold, does it means disabled?


"Able-bodied" means fit, strong, and healthy; not physically disabled.
ChrisKC
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2018 12:14:40 AM

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Location: Chiang Mai, Chiang Mai, Thailand
I quite like "less-abled". Disabled is a generic word that has limitations. Disabled can mean anything from a person with a disability that affects only certain 'abilities', with the strong inference that they can be well able in other areas, and those completely incapacitated.

What I don't like are "disabled car parks" and "disabled toilets" that actually mean I can't park my car there or 'go for a pee' (whether I am disabled or not)
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2018 1:38:57 AM

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Joined: 3/30/2016
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
How terms like disabled or less-abled are used is a complicated issue and there is not one hard and fast rule that fits every person and every circumstance.

Some people who are impaired in some way reject the term disabled and prefer to use terms such as less-abled or differently-abled to self descirbe themselves whilst others fully embrace the term disabled. It varies on a person to person basis and without knowing their particular preferences it can be difficult to know what terms to use.

Some don't like to use the term able-bodied and use the term non-disabled instead.

In the UK we don't have disabled toilets we have toilets that are accessible for all and non-accessible toilets.

It is important though to allow people who are impaired to use facilities such as accessible carparking spaces or toilets to use them. A person who is non-disabled will often have a wide choice of available facilities they can use, there is often only a small number, often only one toilet that is accessible. Disabled people can often have problems with bladder and bowel control that mean they can 't just hold it in whilst you use the facilities meant for them, or need to use things like the grab bars to get leverage to mount of dismount the bowl. It's also important thought remember not all of those people who need to use such facilities appear disabled, some might need to change a colostomy bag or inject medications in areas of the body they would prefer not to have on public display.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
TMe
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2018 2:06:31 AM

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What about differently-abled?

I am a layman.
Hope123
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2018 10:50:27 AM

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A less-abled body could be on a continuum from someone who is just getting older to someone with severe physical difficulties. The point is that the test was hard.

The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do. Anon
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2018 12:16:41 PM

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Here in the States, we still use the term "handicap" for parking spaces and the tag that indicates such a condition and is hung from the mirror in a vehicle. The tag and the parking space has a wheelchair symbol on it, but a person need not be confined to a wheelchair to use the tag.

Some health problems are not obvious, such as lung disease, or muscle weakness, so it can be difficult to determine if a person is using the tag properly or not. I think most people use the tags, parking spaces, and toilets responsibly, but of course there will always be the few who don't.



A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
NKM
Posted: Monday, May 28, 2018 11:57:16 PM

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My complaint is about trying to use "able" as if it were a verb with a past participle form "abled".

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 2:34:46 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
True.
The verbs are 'enable' and 'disable'. "Able" is the adjective.

The 'normal, traditional' wording of the original would be ". . . to do them with a less-able body".


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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