The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Did You Know? #3 - Print File Formats Options
hedy mmm
Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 9:23:55 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/29/2014
Posts: 1,069
Neurons: 494,301
Location: Borough of Bronx, New York, United States
Did You Know? #3 - Print File Formats

I am asked frequently what the following acronyms mean, so I thought I'd share them with TFDers, these brief definitions will help you better understand how each file format is best used.

PDF (Portable Document Format) is a file format developed by Adobe as a means of distributing compact, platform-independent documents. PDF captures formatting information from a variety of desktop publishing applications, making it possible to send formatted documents and have them appear on the recipient's monitor or printer as they were intended. You can use Adobe Acrobat to create PDF files, and you can view PDF files either with Adobe Reader or via a web browser with the PDF Viewer plug-in.

.EPS (Preferred for large signs and banners)
EPS (Encapsulated PostScript)
is a vector format designed for printing to PostScript printers and imagesetters. It is considered the best choice of graphics format for high resolution printing of illustrations. EPS files are created and edited in illustration programs such as Adobe Illustrator or CorelDRAW. Vector graphics are a scalable, resolution-independent format composed of individual objects or shapes. Vector images can be resized easily without loss of quality making them an ideal format for initial logo designs and illustrations to be used in multiple sizes.

.JPG (Preferred for images)
JPG (Joint Photographic Experts Group),
(pronounced jay-peg) is a file format best used for photo images which must be very small files, for example, for web sites or for email. JPG uses lossy compression (lossy meaning "with losses to quality"). Lossy means that some image quality is lost when the JPG data is compressed and saved, and this quality can never be recovered. File compression methods for most other file formats are lossless, meaning "fully recoverable". However, this integrity requirement does limit efficiency, limiting compression of photo image data to only 10% to 40% reduction in practice (graphics can be smaller).

.TIFF (Preferred for high resolution images)
TIFF (Tagged Image File Format)
is an industry standard designed for handling *raster (see bottom for definition) or bitmapped images. TIFF files can be saved in a variety of color formats and in various forms of compression. TIFFs use lossless compression to maintain image integrity and clarity and are often used for professional photography.

.GIF and .PNG
GIF (Graphics Interchange Format)
is a file format for storing graphical images up to 256 colors. It uses a lossless compression method which makes for higher quality output.

PNG (Portable Network Graphics) was created as a more powerful alternative to the GIF file format. PNGs are not restricted to the 256 color limitation of GIF files and have better compression. A PNG file can be saved with a transparent background which allows you to place your image on top of another image without an outlining white box.
GIF files are probably the most popular on the web being used in logos and color images. Even though PNG files are widely supported, GIF is still the most popular.

.ZIP (compression capabilities)
ZIP is a file format used for data archiving and compression. A ZIP file contains one or more files that have been compressed and bundled to reduce file size and allow for easy file transfers. ZIP files can be created by right-clicking on a file or folder and selecting "Compress" (Mac) or "Send To > Compressed/Zipped Folder" (PC). Once a ZIP file is received (eg., via email) it must be "unzipped" or de-compressed before the files themselves can be accessed.

Other Formats
I prefer one of the above formats when submitting files, other then GIF files, for the obvious.

Other Definitions
*Rasterize is used to take "type" and change to art. The type will not be compromised in the final document, however, you cannot just change the font or add more letters. It can now be distorted in developing artwork, as in a logo, and some output houses prefer it. Best to keep font/text as a layer to go back to if needed, or remember the font, size, etc.

hedy



"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
ChrisKC
Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 10:36:09 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/27/2014
Posts: 274
Neurons: 98,196
Location: Chiang Mai, Chiang Mai, Thailand
Hello Hedy,

Very helpful descriptions.

A friendly critique: I think that not all the abbreviations you gave as examples are acronyms. TIFF, GIF and ZIP are true acronyms as the abbreviated letters can be said as words.
hedy mmm
Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 11:18:17 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/29/2014
Posts: 1,069
Neurons: 494,301
Location: Borough of Bronx, New York, United States
ChrisKC wrote:
Hello Hedy,
Very helpful descriptions.
A friendly critique: I think that not all the abbreviations you gave as examples are acronyms. TIFF, GIF and ZIP are true acronyms as the abbreviated letters can be said as words.


Hi ChrisKC,
Thank you for responding, however, I know that the examples I gave...PDF, EPS, JPEG or JPG & PNG are in fact, also acronyms.
Definition: Acronym (noun) is an abbreviation from the initial letters of other words and pronounced as a word.

Hope this was helpful...
hedy

"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
BobShilling
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 1:28:59 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 4/1/2018
Posts: 210
Neurons: 1,870
Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic
What is the difference between the words acronym and initialism?

Acronym is a fairly recent word, dating from the 1940s, although acronyms existed long before we gave them that name. The term was preceded in English by the word initialism, meaning an abbreviation formed from the initial letters of a phrase, and which has been in use since the late 19th century.

Some people feel strongly that acronym should only be used for terms like NATO, which is pronounced as a single word, and that initialism should be used if the individual letters are all pronounced distinctly, as with FBI. Our research shows that acronym is commonly used to refer to both types of abbreviations.


https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/initialism

Usage Note:

In strict usage, the term acronym refers to a word made from the initial letters or parts of other words, such as sonar from so(und) na(vigation and) r(anging). The distinguishing feature of an acronym is that it is pronounced as if it were a single word, in the manner of NATO and NASA. Acronyms are often distinguished from initialisms like FBI and NIH, whose individual letters are pronounced as separate syllables. While observing this distinction has some virtue in precision, it may be lost on many people, for whom the term acronym refers to both kinds of abbreviations.


https://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=acronym&submit.x=42&submit.y=26

Romany
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 7:20:47 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,079
Neurons: 43,425
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Hey Bob,
Not so long ago we had a pretty robust thread on which the difference between an a acronym and initialization was soundly established and explained. The fact that some people choose to use "acronym" for both forms was also clarified .

However as some learners may have missed that thread your reminder is important. As this is a language site - and some students may be destined for academic positions - your post may make a difference between a pass or fail mark for some. Or at least give some the impetus to find that thread, or to look up the difference for themselves so they can choose whether to observe the difference or not.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 7:20:49 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,079
Neurons: 43,425
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Hey Bob,
Not so long ago we had a pretty robust thread on which the difference between an a acronym and initialization was soundly established and explained. The fact that some people choose to use "acronym" for both forms was also clarified .

However as some learners may have missed that thread your reminder is important. As this is a language site - and some students may be destined for academic positions - your post may make a difference between a pass or fail mark for some. Or at least give some the impetus to find that thread, or to look up the difference for themselves so they can choose whether to observe the difference or not.
hedy mmm
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 10:32:49 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/29/2014
Posts: 1,069
Neurons: 494,301
Location: Borough of Bronx, New York, United States
Print File Formats are exactly as I've described, so if you wish to know what they are, (I assume some of you do)...please read the original thread...
I know that my thread went in an another direction then what was intended.

As I read my thread's responses, it brings to mind a favorite quote, and quite apropos, "Don't let the noise of other opinions drown your inner voice" ~ Steve Jobs

hedy

"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
ChrisKC
Posted: Thursday, May 24, 2018 9:27:22 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/27/2014
Posts: 274
Neurons: 98,196
Location: Chiang Mai, Chiang Mai, Thailand
hedy mmm wrote:
ChrisKC wrote:
Hello Hedy,
Very helpful descriptions.
A friendly critique: I think that not all the abbreviations you gave as examples are acronyms. TIFF, GIF and ZIP are true acronyms as the abbreviated letters can be said as words.


Hi ChrisKC,
Thank you for responding, however, I know that the examples I gave...PDF, EPS, JPEG or JPG & PNG are in fact, also acronyms.
Definition: Acronym (noun) is an abbreviation from the initial letters of other words and pronounced as a word.

Hope this was helpful...
hedy


Hello Hedy,

So therefore, my understanding of the definition is different from yours. How do you say, (as a word) PDF?

I will give you "JPEG" - but only the PEG bit,

In the definitions I have read they nearly all give the example of NASA - pronounced Nasser, and very rarely have I heard it referred to in speech as N.A.S.A.

I am open to further persuasion.

Respect from Chris
leonAzul
Posted: Thursday, May 24, 2018 1:14:47 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,312
Neurons: 26,413
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
hedy mmm wrote:
[

.GIF and .PNG
GIF (Graphics Interchange Format)
is a file format for storing graphical images up to 256 colors. It uses a lossless compression method which makes for higher quality output.

PNG (Portable Network Graphics) was created as a more powerful alternative to the GIF file format. PNGs are not restricted to the 256 color limitation of GIF files and have better compression. A PNG file can be saved with a transparent background which allows you to place your image on top of another image without an outlining white box.
GIF files are probably the most popular on the web being used in logos and color images. Even though PNG files are widely supported, GIF is still the most popular.



PNG is an extension of TIFF with standardized XML "tags". It allows for both rasterized (equivalent to "bit-mapped) and vectored graphics and text like SVG. PNG is color-space agnostic, unlike GIF, which is emphatically limited to colors-spaces defined by HTML3, yet maps well to Pantone.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
ChrisKC
Posted: Friday, May 25, 2018 2:49:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/27/2014
Posts: 274
Neurons: 98,196
Location: Chiang Mai, Chiang Mai, Thailand
BobShilling wrote:
What is the difference between the words acronym and initialism?

Acronym is a fairly recent word, dating from the 1940s, although acronyms existed long before we gave them that name. The term was preceded in English by the word initialism, meaning an abbreviation formed from the initial letters of a phrase, and which has been in use since the late 19th century.

Some people feel strongly that acronym should only be used for terms like NATO, which is pronounced as a single word, and that initialism should be used if the individual letters are all pronounced distinctly, as with FBI. Our research shows that acronym is commonly used to refer to both types of abbreviations.


https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/initialism

Usage Note:

In strict usage, the term acronym refers to a word made from the initial letters or parts of other words, such as sonar from so(und) na(vigation and) r(anging). The distinguishing feature of an acronym is that it is pronounced as if it were a single word, in the manner of NATO and NASA. Acronyms are often distinguished from initialisms like FBI and NIH, whose individual letters are pronounced as separate syllables. While observing this distinction has some virtue in precision, it may be lost on many people, for whom the term acronym refers to both kinds of abbreviations.


https://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=acronym&submit.x=42&submit.y=26



Having done a little research on this and reading the responses here ( without me realising there was a previous thread clarifying matters) I am bound to say I have learned something: That(abbreviations/acronyms don't have to sound like a word and that I was wrong in asserting that they did. Though I would say also, it matters which definition you read.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.