The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Pound and copy Options
D00M
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 12:18:26 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 1,091
Neurons: 5,649
Hello respected teachers,

As a result, no one could make a living as a writer in the early seventeenth century by producing best sellers. The first writer formally to arrange for royalties was John Milton, who received five pounds up front for Paradise Lost, and another five pounds and five hundred copies at the end of each of the first three impressions.

What does the underlined mean in the above please?



I am looking forward to your answers.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 1:31:14 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 28,840
Neurons: 164,997
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!

I understand that he was paid £5 (about $7) when the book first went to press. And he was given £5 plus 500 free books to sell each time they printed a new load.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
D00M
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 4:45:51 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 1,091
Neurons: 5,649
Interesting.
Thank you, DS.

I am looking forward to your answers.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 6:35:41 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 28,840
Neurons: 164,997
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Yes - it sounds a bit 'odd' these days, but that seems to be what the article says.

He received five pounds when they first printed the book - not a lot, but it definitely fits the idea of 'royalties'.

Then when they had printed off the first load (how many, I wonder?) he was given another five pounds and the last 500 books.
He had to sell them himself to make money on them. The publisher kept all the profits from all the other books.

That happened three times (so he ended up with £20 - and 1500 books to sell personally).
After that, the book belonged to the publishing house, and he would get nothing for any future impressions.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 9:30:01 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,989
Neurons: 43,045
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
There is one exception in the 17thC however - the female writer Aphra Behn was the first person ever to make money from writing.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 10:11:03 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 28,840
Neurons: 164,997
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
WOW - And published under her own name, not a male nom-de-plume!

Quite amazing.



An altogether wild woman - supporter of Prince Charlie Stuart in exile and as king later, one of the first ever Tories (the first political party ever created), a spy, novelist and playwright - one of the few non-royal women buried in Westminster.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 2:44:49 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,989
Neurons: 43,045
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Oh yeah, she sure was one ground-breaking woman - which is why Virginia Woolf said that all women should place flowers on her grave. But Aphra herself was standing on the shoulders of Margaret Cavendish - the first person ever to write fiction! (Though when "Oroonoko" came out people thought it was a true story!)
ChrisKC
Posted: Saturday, May 19, 2018 4:16:18 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/27/2014
Posts: 242
Neurons: 70,825
Location: Chiang Mai, Chiang Mai, Thailand
I learned a lot from this post - thank you all.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.