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Is it okay to omit some words? Options
robjen
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 1:29:56 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/17/2015
Posts: 579
Neurons: 3,251
I am going to make up a few sentences.

(1) While (you are) at work, you are not allowed to use the internet for personal entertainment.

(2) I will call you about the product you need when (it is) available.

(3) He might be at work if (he is) not at home.

Is it grammatically OK to omit the highlighted words from the sentences?

Thanks a lot.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 2:58:48 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,146
Neurons: 176,951
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!

They would all be understandable, and are correct.

They sound slightly formal. This is unusual, as in English it is often the case that the conversational version omits words.

1. "While at work, . . ." sounds more like an official statement.
"While you're at work, you can't use the internet" sounds conversational.

2. I will call you about the product you need when available. standard business letter
I'll call you about the product you need when it's here. business e-mail to someone you know (maybe a regular customer)


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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