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Solicitors? Options
ChrisKC
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 3:21:55 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/27/2014
Posts: 274
Neurons: 128,536
Location: Chiang Mai, Chiang Mai, Thailand
The British English word "solicitor" is interesting because I recently saw in a photo, a sign outside someone's house in USA stating "No Solicitors". At first I was surprised, thinking: what's wrong with Solicitors? But learned later this word, especially the noun, has a different meaning in America.

Given the incredible number of jokes about Lawyers, it seems to me only fair that we in Britain reciprocate with a sign on our gates, "No Lawyers" - as in "Solicitors Twinned with Lawyers"
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 4:28:55 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,740
Neurons: 172,472
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Ho, ho, ho.

In Britain, you would see "No soliciting".



Of course, 'soliciting' has a couple of other meanings . . .



EDITED to add: You say "we in Britain" but your location is . . .?

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
ChrisKC
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 4:46:09 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/27/2014
Posts: 274
Neurons: 128,536
Location: Chiang Mai, Chiang Mai, Thailand
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Ho, ho, ho.

In Britain, you would see "No soliciting".



Of course, 'soliciting' has a couple of other meanings . . .



EDITED to add: You say "we in Britain" but your location is . . .?


Or "No Hawkers or Circulars"
ChrisKC
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 4:47:57 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/27/2014
Posts: 274
Neurons: 128,536
Location: Chiang Mai, Chiang Mai, Thailand
ChrisKC wrote:
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Ho, ho, ho.

In Britain, you would see "No soliciting".



Of course, 'soliciting' has a couple of other meanings . . .



EDITED to add: You say "we in Britain" but your location is . . .?


Or "No Hawkers or Circulars"


I am Englishman but now living in Thailand
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 5:05:27 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,740
Neurons: 172,472
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Ah!
I'm an Englishman living in Scotland - not quite the same order of magnitude.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 5:50:16 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,222
Neurons: 44,078
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Chris,
I think I this is one of those words that went to the USA with a common meaning but branched off in England in a way it didn't in America.

"Solicit" came from the French meaning of "harrass" or " disturb" from Latin.Hence the sign you saw. However in around the 16thC in France the word Siliciteur" came to mean "One who speaks out for another". This new meaning spread to England a little later, while in America they were too busy establishing a new country to come across it, while we adopted it to define an occupation.

We still use "solicit" in England ...(to solicit for votes,donations,subscriptions etc.) but the sense is not as pejorative as it was and stems from the original Fee h "solicit". But the later "solicitor" had a new meaning entirely, synonymous to "advocator".

So it must sound rather weird to Americans when we happy announce we're off to see our "solicitor" !

(ps. Chang Mai is a fabulous place to live: lucky you! But how do you get on with all those drunken Aussies??)

(Pps. I'm an honorary Aussie - so I can get away with questions like that!)

Parpar1836
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2018 3:45:06 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/30/2014
Posts: 282
Neurons: 9,956
Location: Rochester, New York, United States
I daresay I love those signs! The yellow one employs cheeky British humor.

LL
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 3:16:09 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,740
Neurons: 172,472
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I'm glad you like it.
Your user-name always makes me think of an old friend Francois - he drew cartoons under the name "Frapar".

Cheeky French humour.

- "Want another drink?"
- "Hang on, I'll do a risk analysis."



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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