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Please kindly suggest some legal English books. Options
ploy_angjoe
Posted: Tuesday, October 3, 2017 4:26:58 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/15/2011
Posts: 128
Neurons: 479
Hi Everyone.
I am trying to improve my English skills especially writing and reading in legal term.
Could you please suggest any materials such as textbooks?
For your information, my English level is in the intermediate level.
Some told me to start with "Professional English in Use Law". Is it good for the beginner in legal English learner?
Actually my short goal is to be able to understand some legal agreement and draft agreement in English.
Any advice are welcome. Thank you ^____^
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Tuesday, October 3, 2017 6:34:24 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/13/2015
Posts: 1,356
Neurons: 500,500
Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
ploy_angjoe wrote:
I am trying to improve my English skills especially writing and reading in legal term.
Could you please suggest any materials such as textbooks?
For your information, my English level is in the intermediate level.

When I arrived to Canada I decided to acquaint myself with the law and I read this book:

https://www.amazon.ca/Every-Canadians-Guide-Law-4th/dp/1554688825

I must say it was interesting reading. I do not remember if there's something about 'habeas corpus' or 'bill of attainder' but 'subpoena' and 'summons' I learned from this book. :)

And at the time I was at level C1.

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
ploy_angjoe
Posted: Tuesday, October 3, 2017 11:31:41 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/15/2011
Posts: 128
Neurons: 479
Thank you very much Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
It sounds a good book for beginner like me.
I will try to find this book here. :)))
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 10:20:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/3/2016
Posts: 1,421
Neurons: 74,351
Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
Dear angjoe,

I am a lawyer with considerable standing. I advise you to read, study, understand and analyze the judgements of the famous judges and pleadings of legal luminaries for a vocabulary of legal terms written English.

For spoken English, try to speak English with your friends, teachers and family.

Learn the art of making a speech in English.Dancing Dancing Dancing

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
dusty
Posted: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 11:18:58 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/13/2012
Posts: 1,769
Neurons: 5,755
the only thing I got for you is that in small claims court the term "time-barred" is sometimes referred to as "clock-blocked"

isn't that right Jesse?

To be concerned of the fate of the world is not bad, but bearing false witness is to not be
taurine
Posted: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 12:54:37 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/20/2016
Posts: 865
Neurons: 68,033
Location: South Dublin, Ireland
ploy_angjoe wrote:
Hi Everyone.
I am trying to improve my English skills especially writing and reading in legal term.
Could you please suggest any materials such as textbooks?
For your information, my English level is in the intermediate level.
Some told me to start with "Professional English in Use Law". Is it good for the beginner in legal English learner?
Actually my short goal is to be able to understand some legal agreement and draft agreement in English.
Any advice are welcome. Thank you ^____^


Dear ploy_angjoe,

I wish to share with you my own, personal experience.

When I have come to Ireland where I am living now, I bought certain book about Spanish history. It was hard to read, much harder than any book written by Norman Davies.

Later on I decided on to buy some books about the law. They were consisting of no more than 200 pages. Not good at all. Why? Because they were concise legal books, giving only a brief understanding of the matter they were treating about.
If you are a lawyer who knows the law at your own country - and this means that you are well beyond any average scale of reader in your mother tongue language - it is hard to learn foreign language from a book prepared for a native who has not accomplished University degree. [You may think about a SpongBob teaching you who is a lawyer. Totally forget about that kind of books if you are a barrister.]

After that I have paid a subscription for Newsweek. And this was the beginning of the fun.
The Newsweek and the Times magazines are issued weekly. They contain many excellent articles and photos. I had been making notes on pages of these magazines comprising of words appropriate to use them as suitable to understand the meaning of words I didn't know. But I used English language, only. Using English language to explain to yourself the meaning of words you do not understand is the fastest way to learn English. Strange as it may sound, but this is true. Do not use your mother tongue language while making your notes related to the word you are learning. I may admit that the dictionary I used at first was Merriam Webster, and I paid a fee to use its resources. But Merriam Webster I had found not as good as thefreedictionary, the access to which I had not paid at all. Why? Because I had an opportunity to ask wise people on this forum for their guidance. And, even more, I am reading what is the style they are writing, what helps extremely. Many people on this forum use excellent quality of language. Some of them not. But always you may learn a lot about English language from the people posting here.

I think that I am getting a bit wordy, here.
To sum up, I like Muay Thai, that is a combat sport of Thailand that uses stand-up striking along with various clinching techniques.

The Law of Contract by Edwin Peel, B.C.L., M.A.
Fellow & Tutor in Law,
Keble College, Oxford
Solicitor & Consultant,
Clifford Chance LLP

Treitel


J'ai perdu mes amis en Afrique durant la dernière semaine de 2017
taurine
Posted: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 1:17:50 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/20/2016
Posts: 865
Neurons: 68,033
Location: South Dublin, Ireland
To continue, because it is not appropriate from my point of view to write anything below Treitel, I wish to introduce you to the wisdom of the thoughts expressed by the luminaries of the Irish Courts, that is, in http://www.courts.ie/Judgments.nsf/Webpages/HomePage?OpenDocument

Reading the judgements will give you an opportunity to learn the English.
The Irish law system is actually still deriving from the common law. This means that, the wisdom of the people presiding over the benches in New Zealand, Australia, United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland may be available to you.

Enjoy.

P.s.
I forgot about quite a substantial number of Caribbean and Pacific states. I am sorry. I wish to be there. Drool

p.p.s.
The Economist is the best of them all.

J'ai perdu mes amis en Afrique durant la dernière semaine de 2017
TMe
Posted: Monday, April 30, 2018 12:24:57 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/12/2017
Posts: 779
Neurons: 4,943
Legal English books or English Legal books??

I am a layman.
TMe
Posted: Monday, April 30, 2018 12:26:38 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/12/2017
Posts: 779
Neurons: 4,943
Legal English books or English Legal books?

I am a layman.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, May 18, 2018 12:45:32 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,329
Neurons: 178,807
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
TMe wrote:
Legal English books or English Legal books?


Think Think hmmm Think Think

There are not, these days, many illegal English books - so there are millions (if not gazillions) of legal English books.

I think we would have to say "English legal books" - books written in English on the subject of law, the English used in courts and by lawyers (with a few Latin phrases thrown in for fun).

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Wednesday, June 6, 2018 12:40:11 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/3/2016
Posts: 1,421
Neurons: 74,351
Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
Gazillions (uncountable) is a better word than millions (countable).

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
ploy_angjoe
Posted: Thursday, November 8, 2018 4:51:04 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/15/2011
Posts: 128
Neurons: 479
First of all, please accept my apologize. Please _/\_
I don't even know that you guys will be nice to answer my questions.
I thought my topic was done. I am pleased very much that you guys kept trying to help you as much as you can.
Thank you so much. Please let me answer individual person below.
ploy_angjoe
Posted: Thursday, November 8, 2018 5:03:54 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/15/2011
Posts: 128
Neurons: 479
Ashwin Joshi wrote:
Dear angjoe,

I am a lawyer with considerable standing. I advise you to read, study, understand and analyze the judgements of the famous judges and pleadings of legal luminaries for a vocabulary of legal terms written English.

For spoken English, try to speak English with your friends, teachers and family.

Learn the art of making a speech in English.Dancing Dancing Dancing


Thank you very much, Joshi.
Practice makes perfect. Practice all skills could become a great result.
Besides I should practice all skills. I wish one day I could be able to communicate smoothly with English. :)
Art of speech is one of charisma that every lawyers should have. A Lawyers is a consultant for his client.
Unfortunately, I have no one to speak English with......
I already graduated. My friends don't mind about their English skills. Most concern on barrister examination.
However, lucky to me. BBC news and Youtubers are my tutor listening skills. While thefreedictionary members are my teacher for reading and writing skills. :)
ploy_angjoe
Posted: Thursday, November 8, 2018 5:48:27 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/15/2011
Posts: 128
Neurons: 479
taurine wrote:
ploy_angjoe wrote:
Hi Everyone.
I am trying to improve my English skills especially writing and reading in legal term.
Could you please suggest any materials such as textbooks?
For your information, my English level is in the intermediate level.
Some told me to start with "Professional English in Use Law". Is it good for the beginner in legal English learner?
Actually my short goal is to be able to understand some legal agreement and draft agreement in English.
Any advice are welcome. Thank you ^____^


Dear ploy_angjoe,

I wish to share with you my own, personal experience.

When I have come to Ireland where I am living now, I bought certain book about Spanish history. It was hard to read, much harder than any book written by Norman Davies.

Later on I decided on to buy some books about the law. They were consisting of no more than 200 pages. Not good at all. Why? Because they were concise legal books, giving only a brief understanding of the matter they were treating about.
If you are a lawyer who knows the law at your own country - and this means that you are well beyond any average scale of reader in your mother tongue language - it is hard to learn foreign language from a book prepared for a native who has not accomplished University degree. [You may think about a SpongBob teaching you who is a lawyer. Totally forget about that kind of books if you are a barrister.]

After that I have paid a subscription for Newsweek. And this was the beginning of the fun.
The Newsweek and the Times magazines are issued weekly. They contain many excellent articles and photos. I had been making notes on pages of these magazines comprising of words appropriate to use them as suitable to understand the meaning of words I didn't know. But I used English language, only. Using English language to explain to yourself the meaning of words you do not understand is the fastest way to learn English. Strange as it may sound, but this is true. Do not use your mother tongue language while making your notes related to the word you are learning. I may admit that the dictionary I used at first was Merriam Webster, and I paid a fee to use its resources. But Merriam Webster I had found not as good as thefreedictionary, the access to which I had not paid at all. Why? Because I had an opportunity to ask wise people on this forum for their guidance. And, even more, I am reading what is the style they are writing, what helps extremely. Many people on this forum use excellent quality of language. Some of them not. But always you may learn a lot about English language from the people posting here.

I think that I am getting a bit wordy, here.
To sum up, I like Muay Thai, that is a combat sport of Thailand that uses stand-up striking along with various clinching techniques.

The Law of Contract by Edwin Peel, B.C.L., M.A.
Fellow & Tutor in Law,
Keble College, Oxford
Solicitor & Consultant,
Clifford Chance LLP

Treitel

Dear Taurine,
Thank you very much for your experience sharing. I enjoy your short story very much. The greatest shortcut to succeed is learning the way successful person's way. It could help me to understand and adapt with my behavior well.
I do agree that EN-EN dictionary is better than EN-my mother language dictionary. I learn how they form a sentence which explains my new word easily. Besides some words are not available in my mother language. We study a civil law but UK and US use common law. I wonder if I should read judgment by judge, court, luminaries for practicing my law English.
I will try to read them. Also practice by reading BBC news website and listening radio online.

Very nice to hear that you like Muay Thai "Clinching". I sometimes practice Muay Thai for fun and learning self-defense weapons. Have you ever come to Thailand? There are varieties muay thai such as Chaiya, Muay Boran. They have their own techniques style which are totally different.
ploy_angjoe
Posted: Thursday, November 8, 2018 5:56:43 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/15/2011
Posts: 128
Neurons: 479
taurine wrote:
To continue, because it is not appropriate from my point of view to write anything below Treitel, I wish to introduce you to the wisdom of the thoughts expressed by the luminaries of the Irish Courts, that is, in http://www.courts.ie/Judgments.nsf/Webpages/HomePage?OpenDocument

Reading the judgements will give you an opportunity to learn the English.
The Irish law system is actually still deriving from the common law. This means that, the wisdom of the people presiding over the benches in New Zealand, Australia, United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland may be available to you.

Enjoy.

P.s.
I forgot about quite a substantial number of Caribbean and Pacific states. I am sorry. I wish to be there. Drool

p.p.s.
The Economist is the best of them all.


Thank you and hope you will be there soon!
ploy_angjoe
Posted: Thursday, November 8, 2018 5:59:25 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/15/2011
Posts: 128
Neurons: 479
TMe wrote:
Legal English books or English Legal books?



Thanks to mention it.
Dear Drag0nspeaker and Ashwin Joshi...Thank you for your clarify.
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