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Nature repairs her ravages, but not all. The uptorn trees are not rooted again; the parted hills are left scarred; if there... Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, April 21, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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Nature repairs her ravages, but not all. The uptorn trees are not rooted again; the parted hills are left scarred; if there is a new growth, the trees are not the same as the old ... To the eyes that have dwelt on the past, there is no thorough repair.

George Eliot (1819-1880)
KSPavan
Posted: Saturday, April 21, 2018 3:24:21 AM

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Quotation of the Day

Nature repairs her ravages, but not all. The uptorn trees are not rooted again; the parted hills are left scarred; if there is a new growth, the trees are not the same as the old ... To the eyes that have dwelt on the past, there is no thorough repair.

George Eliot (1819-1880)
Jim Cape
Posted: Saturday, April 21, 2018 3:47:25 AM

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After years of listening to her talk in the same manner as she wrote. Her husband got tired of mumbling under his breath "(WTF) did she just say?" d'oh! and killed himself!
Bully_rus
Posted: Saturday, April 21, 2018 9:40:53 AM
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Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Daemon wrote:
Nature repairs her ravages, but not all. The uptorn trees are not rooted again; the parted hills are left scarred; if there is a new growth, the trees are not the same as the old ... To the eyes that have dwelt on the past, there is no thorough repair.

George Eliot (1819-1880)


Yeah. It's better to dwell on the present, because both the past and the future depend on it...
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, April 21, 2018 9:59:09 AM

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That last part is particularly true. For those who dwell on the past, a constant state of misery accompanies them, for the offense is always present within them. There can be no healing, no accommodation, for they are perpetually in a state of offense. Therefore, their complaints are to be given the value they deserve, namely, zero.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
monamagda
Posted: Saturday, April 21, 2018 10:32:06 AM

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Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia

Context from:The Mill on the Floss

Conclusion

Nature repairs her ravages — repairs them with her sunshine, and with human labor. The desolation wrought by that flood had left little visible trace on the face of the earth, five years after. The fifth autumn was rich in golden cornstacks, rising in thick clusters among the distant hedgerows; the wharves and warehouses on the Floss were busy again, with echoes of eager voices, with hopeful lading and unlading.

And every man and woman mentioned in this history was still living, except those whose end we know.

Nature repairs her ravages, but not all. The uptorn trees are not rooted again; the parted hills are left scarred; if there is a new growth, the trees are not the same as the old, and the hills underneath their green vesture bear the marks of the past rending. To the eyes that have dwelt on the past, there is no thorough repair.

Dorlcote Mill was rebuilt. And Dorlcote churchyard — where the brick grave that held a father whom we know, was found with the stone laid prostrate upon it after the flood — had recovered all its grassy order and decent quiet.

Near that brick grave there was a tomb erected, very soon after the flood, for two bodies that were found in close embrace; and it was visited at different moments by two men who both felt that their keenest joy and keenest sorrow were forever buried there.

One of them visited the tomb again with a sweet face beside him; but that was years after.

The other was always solitary. His great companionship was among the trees of the Red Deeps, where the buried joy seemed still to hover, like a revisiting spirit.

The tomb bore the names of Tom and Maggie Tulliver, and below the names it was written —

“In their death they were not divided.”


https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/e/eliot/george/e42mf/chapter59.html


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