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Whatever happened to the verb "to rare"? Options
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 6:26:52 AM

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We have the present participle - raring - but nothing else. No infinitive, no finite forms, not even a past participle.

Who stole them?

I'm raring to find out.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
mactoria
Posted: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 6:50:48 AM
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DragOnspeaker: Checked a few references to confirm what I thought was the history of "raring." Merriam indicates it's either a variant of "to rear" or "to roar" or possibly a conflation of both, while The Grammarist spells out my understanding which is that "raring" is a colloquialism from the American South of the 1800s and was a southern regionalism of "to rear" as in a horse rearing up and creating a ruckus; with The Grammarist further indicating that it's now used in other English-speaking countries as a colloquialism. I lean toward The Grammarist's version myself, though either reference points to there really not being a true "to rare" verb form, other than as a variant. But I suspect other references might have other stories, this seems to be a word/phrase that's a little foggy in terms of origin.
papo_308
Posted: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 7:30:33 AM
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Interesting, I encountered this word in the song I Ride an Old Paint sung by Johnny Cash long ago, but didn't look into its origin.
sureshot
Posted: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 1:18:33 PM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
We have the present participle - raring - but nothing else. No infinitive, no finite forms, not even a past participle.

Who stole them?

I'm raring to find out.

______________________________

In modern English, "raring (= very enthusiastic) is essentially used as an adjective. You can also call it "verb-link ADJECTIVE" or "ADJECTIVE to-infinitive". Both the Cambridge Dictionary and Oxford Dictionary classify the word as an adjective.

In the sentence "I'm raring to find out", "raring" is an adjective. The best way to check its grammatical function is to replace the word with "enthusiastic". If the sentence continues to provide sense, it functions as an adjective.
BobShilling
Posted: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 4:01:24 PM
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'Raring' has few of the characteristics of an adjective. It cannot be used attributively; it has no comparative and superlative; it cannot be preceded by adverbs such as 'very'.
palapaguy
Posted: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 11:07:46 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
We have the present participle - raring - but nothing else. No infinitive, no finite forms, not even a past participle.

Who stole them?

I'm raring to find out.


So we have the word "raring." It means very enthusiastic and eager to do something.

Why would you ask for anything more? It might be a let down.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, April 19, 2018 2:20:44 AM

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palapaguy wrote:
So we have the word "raring." It means very enthusiastic and eager to do something.
Why would you ask for anything more? It might be a let down.

Simply my insatiable curiosity (or even "Satiable Curtiosity").


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Audiendus
Posted: Thursday, April 19, 2018 7:05:55 AM
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For the use of "rare" in the sense of "to rear (up)", see here.
thar
Posted: Friday, April 20, 2018 3:59:15 AM

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Presumably 'to rare' is the opposite of 'to cook well'. Whistle
sureshot
Posted: Saturday, April 21, 2018 12:52:44 PM
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BobShilling wrote:
'Raring' has few of the characteristics of an adjective. It cannot be used attributively; it has no comparative and superlative; it cannot be preceded by adverbs such as 'very'.


______________________

Here is a sentence from New York, Volume 32, Issues 22-28


- "I was really raring to go out and do what I could," he recalls.

I clarify, that I am not a fan of using adverbs before the adjective "raring". I wonder what others have to say on the use of adverbs before the adjective "raring".
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, April 21, 2018 2:18:17 PM

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To my ear, adverbs reducing or intensifying "raring" sound either 'odd' or redundant.

It is rather like adjectives which describe a state which has no gradient (She was almost pregnant.)

"Raring" in itself is intense.
I was mildly raring to go - just doesn't work.
I was immensely raring to go - redundant.

For stress or to express emotion of some sort, one could use an adverb to modify the whole clause. This is not the same thing at all.

Usually, I was raring to go.
I was usually raring to go.
Surprisingly, I was raring to go.
I was, surprisingly, raring to go.


However, in form, these are no different from the progressive form of a verb (though I can't think of many examples in which it would be used).
Surprisingly, I was acting very enthusiastic, considering the situation.
I was, surprisingly, acting very enthusiastic, considering the situation.


I suppose it's the common conundrum posed by members - "Is this '-ing' word an adjective or a participle?"
The answer is rarely a definite one or the other - since sentences with verbs obviously in the progressive aspect often have exactly the same form as ones with the main verb "be" and an adjective.

The answer is often, "It is a participle which describes the noun (like an adjective) and indicates continuity of state (like a progressive)."


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
BobShilling
Posted: Saturday, April 21, 2018 3:35:24 PM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
To my ear, adverbs reducing or intensifying "raring" sound either 'odd' or redundant.


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