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preposition 'of' Options
onsen
Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 5:53:14 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/14/2017
Posts: 147
Neurons: 3,243
Hello,

Quote:
All his eight pall-bearers were humble men, and the congregation included factory workers,
ex-chimney sweeps, women liberated from the mines, children from the ragged schools,
and the London costermongers who had once made him a present of a donkey.
(from Earl of Shaftesbury)
…………………………………………………………………………………………………

of
prep.
20. Used to indicate an appositive: that idiot of a driver.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language.


Does 'of' in brown mean the definition 20.?

Thank you
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, April 14, 2018 2:14:41 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 28,446
Neurons: 161,951
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi onsen.

I think you are right.
The Collins dictionary has two definitions which would fit here. However, I can't really see much difference between them in this case. In some phrases, the term 'apposition' is not correct.

of prep
. . .
4. constituted by, containing, or characterised by: a family of idiots; a rod of iron; a man of some depth.
. . .
6. used to mark apposition: the city of Naples; a speech on the subject of archaeology.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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