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two definitions of 'mummy' Options
onsen
Posted: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 7:34:29 PM
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Hello,

Quote:
mummy
n. pl. mummies
1.The dead body of a human or animal that has been embalmed and prepared for burial, as according to the practices of the ancient Egyptians.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition.

mummy noun
2 a body of a human or an animal that has been mummified
an Egyptian mummy
Oxford Learner’s Dictionaries



American Heritage defines the noun 'mummy' as 'The dead body of a human or animal …' while Oxford Learner’s Dictionaries defines it as 'a body of a human or an animal…'

One uses the definite article in 'The dead body of…' while the other uses the indefinite article in 'a body of…'.

Where does this difference come from?

Thank you
palapaguy
Posted: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 8:15:38 PM

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"Body" can mean either a living or dead person/animal.
onsen
Posted: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 9:27:39 PM
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palapaguy wrote:
"Body" can mean either a living or dead person/animal.


Thank you very much, palapaguy.

I can’t understand the phrase 'a body of a human'. The phrase seems to suggest that 'a human' possesses more than two bodies, which is impossible.
palapaguy
Posted: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 9:38:40 PM

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Here is a living human body: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_body A human possesses only one body.

"Human body" can also mean a dead body. Context determines which usage applies.

There are two usages for "body". It's no more complicated than that.
onsen
Posted: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 10:00:44 PM
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palapaguy wrote:
Here is a living human body: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_body A human possesses only one body.

"Human body" can also mean a dead body. Context determines which usage applies.

There are two usages for "body". It's no more complicated than that.


Please consider the following sentence.

She is a wife of Mr. A. (not She is the wife of Mr. A.)
Doesn't this sentence mean that Mr. A has more than two wives?
palapaguy
Posted: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 10:30:15 PM

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onsen wrote:
palapaguy wrote:
Here is a living human body: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_body A human possesses only one body.

"Human body" can also mean a dead body. Context determines which usage applies.

There are two usages for "body". It's no more complicated than that.


Please consider the following sentence.

She is a wife of Mr. A. (not She is the wife of Mr. A.)
Doesn't this sentence mean that Mr. A has more than two wives?

No.
onsen
Posted: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 10:47:56 PM
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palapaguy wrote:
onsen wrote:
palapaguy wrote:
Here is a living human body: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_body A human possesses only one body.

"Human body" can also mean a dead body. Context determines which usage applies.

There are two usages for "body". It's no more complicated than that.


Please consider the following sentence.

She is a wife of Mr. A. (not She is the wife of Mr. A.)
Doesn't this sentence mean that Mr. A has more than two wives?

No.


re:
She is a wife of Mr. A.

I understand that you mean the above sentence means that Mr. A has only one wife, that is, 'She'.
This is contrary to my understanding.

palapaguy
Posted: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 11:10:35 PM

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onsen wrote:
palapaguy wrote:
onsen wrote:
palapaguy wrote:
Here is a living human body: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_body A human possesses only one body.

"Human body" can also mean a dead body. Context determines which usage applies.

There are two usages for "body". It's no more complicated than that.


Please consider the following sentence.

She is a wife of Mr. A. (not She is the wife of Mr. A.)
Doesn't this sentence mean that Mr. A has more than two wives?

No.


re:
She is a wife of Mr. A.

I understand that you mean the above sentence means that Mr. A has only one wife, that is, 'She'.
This is contrary to my understanding.


"She is a wife of Mr. A" is poorly phrased. It would not be used unless one is intentionally trying to create the impression that Mr. A is an adulterer.
onsen
Posted: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 11:46:30 PM
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palapaguy wrote:

"She is a wife of Mr. A" is poorly phrased. It would not be used unless one is intentionally trying to create the impression that Mr. A is an adulterer.


I'm not familiar with other countries' laws, but it is a fact there are countries where the above sentence is accepted.

In monogamous countries, the sentence 'She is the wife of Mr. A.' is the norm. And in otherwise countries, the sentence 'She is a wife of Mr. A.' is the norm, where the problem such as an adulterer doesn't occur.
What is clear now from this is that:
The phrase 'a body of a human' means 'one of more than two bodies of a human'.
palapaguy
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2018 12:01:09 AM

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onsen wrote:
[quote=palapaguy]
What is clear now from this is that:
The phrase 'a body of a human' means 'one of more than two bodies of a human'.

That makes no sense. I gave you the definition.
onsen
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2018 12:31:36 AM
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palapaguy wrote:
onsen wrote:
[quote=palapaguy]
What is clear now from this is that:
The phrase 'a body of a human' means 'one of more than two bodies of a human'.

That makes no sense. I gave you the definition.


Thank you very much for the argument so far.

I suppose that the phrase 'a body of a human' is something like 'a figure of a human'.
Is that right?
leonAzul
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2018 4:19:25 AM

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onsen wrote:
palapaguy wrote:
"Body" can mean either a living or dead person/animal.


Thank you very much, palapaguy.

I can’t understand the phrase 'a body of a human'. The phrase seems to suggest that 'a human' possesses more than two bodies, which is impossible.



That's because the definition answers the question, "What is a mummy?"

Most native speakers in America would also understand the word "mummy" to mean a corpse that has been prepared for burial with herbs and ointments and then wrapped in strips of linen or other fabric.

Mummification is the preservation of the flesh of a dead animal through a similar process, whether by design or natural accident.

Quote:
3. mummification - embalmment and drying a dead body and wrapping it as a mummy







"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2018 5:08:30 AM

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And always remember not to call a mommy mummy.
Whistle


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
coag
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2018 2:14:40 PM

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I have the same difficulties as onsen with: A body of a human or animal that has been mummified.

I don't know why, but I would have less difficulties if the sentence were written with commas: A body, of a human or animal, that has been mummified.
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