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Be drawn to fire Options
ClaireNguyen
Posted: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 11:55:25 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 2/6/2018
Posts: 18
Neurons: 435
Hi all,

I am seeking the meaning of "be drawn to fire" on Internet, but I have just found the phrase "draw fire".
Please help me explain its meaning in the following sentence:"Behind every apparently sensible scientist is a child who was irrationally drawn to fire".

I am not sure whether "draw to fire" is a phrase or each is an independent verb. If it is the latter, then I think "draw" here is "choose". When looking for "fire" in the Oxford Dictionary, however, I have discovered that most of the meanings of "fire" is a transitive verb.



leonAzul
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2018 12:09:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,170
Neurons: 26,000
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
ClaireNguyen wrote:
Hi all,

I am seeking the meaning of "be drawn to fire" on Internet, but I have just found the phrase "draw fire".
Please help me explain its meaning in the following sentence:"Behind every apparently sensible scientist is a child who was irrationally drawn to fire".

I am not sure whether "draw to fire" is a phrase or each is an independent verb. If it is the latter, then I think "draw" here is "choose". When looking for "fire" in the Oxford Dictionary, however, I have discovered that most of the meanings of "fire" is a transitive verb.





In this context the sentence could be paraphrased as: "Behind every apparently sensible scientist is a child who was irrationally attracted to fire". This pattern can be described as "to be drawn to something", which means to be attracted or lured by something.

The phrase "to draw fire" means something very different: to provoke an attack.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
thar
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2018 3:40:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 16,823
Neurons: 67,568
All the different meanings of 'draw' come from the same origin - to drag, to pull.

So here a child is 'dragged' towards a fire by their curiosity - they can't stop being attracted to it, even though it is dangerous.



This is a passive verb - a child is drawn, pulled, towards the fire, by their curiosity and interest.
Adults learn that fire is dangerous and (most!) learn to stay away, but children are attracted towards it without fear. That is the metaphor here.


If you 'draw fire' you do something pull the fire (the bullets being fired) towards you, usually to protect somebody else.
That is a active verb - something you do.


[To draw is to pull a pencil across the page.
To draw a match is to pull away at the end of the match without one side defeating the other.
To 'draw lots' is to pull your selection out of the bag or barrel. A lottery draw is when the numbers are pulled out.
And a drawer is a piece of furniture you pull to open.]
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