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Carmenex
Posted: Friday, April 6, 2018 7:52:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,018
Neurons: 5,369
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
I also appreciate X Inc.'s demonstrated capacity/capability to successfully tackle the issues that the project finance industry has experienced/(been experiencing) in/over the last few years which have seen a shift/trend from social infrastructure investments to economic infrastructure projects, which tend to be more complicated and present more risks (than (the former/social infrastructure deals). do you need it?).
FounDit
Posted: Friday, April 6, 2018 10:21:27 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,906
Neurons: 51,966
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
It is a very long and verbose sentence, so I suggest shortening it with a bit of rewording. My suggestion would be:

I also appreciate X Inc.'s demonstrated capability to successfully tackle the issues that the project finance industry has experienced over the last few years, which have shifted from social infrastructure investments to more complicated and riskier economic infrastructure projects.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Saturday, April 7, 2018 9:28:36 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,018
Neurons: 5,369
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
It is a very long and verbose sentence, so I suggest shortening it with a bit of rewording. My suggestion would be:

I also appreciate X Inc.'s demonstrated capability to successfully tackle the issues that the project finance industry has experienced over the last few years, which have shifted from social infrastructure investments to more complicated and riskier economic infrastructure projects.


Thank you, FounDit, for your suggestions. I only have a couple of questions.
Why do you suggest using which have shifted rather than which have seen a shift? Is it the latter expression incorrect, or is it just a matter of style?
Is which have shifted referred to issues or to years?
Which of the adverbs in bold (if any) you think is the most appropriate in: ... from social infrastructure investments to generally/basically more complicated and riskier economic infrastructure projects.
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, April 7, 2018 10:40:12 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,906
Neurons: 51,966
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
It is a very long and verbose sentence, so I suggest shortening it with a bit of rewording. My suggestion would be:

I also appreciate X Inc.'s demonstrated capability to successfully tackle the issues that the project finance industry has experienced over the last few years, which have shifted from social infrastructure investments to more complicated and riskier economic infrastructure projects.


Thank you, FounDit, for your suggestions. I only have a couple of questions.
Why do you suggest using which have shifted rather than which have seen a shift? Is it the latter expression incorrect, or is it just a matter of style?
Just a matter of style.

Is which have shifted referred to issues or to years?
Issues. The issues have shifted over the years. It would probably be more accurate to say the focus on issues has shifted, but I see no reason to make that change, since that is the essence anyway.

Which of the adverbs in bold (if any) you think is the most appropriate in: ... from social infrastructure investments to generally/basically more complicated and riskier economic infrastructure projects.
I see no need for either, and would not use them, but if you choose to use one, I'd suggest "generally".



We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Saturday, April 7, 2018 12:19:55 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,018
Neurons: 5,369
FounDit wrote:

Which of the adverbs in bold (if any) you think is the most appropriate in: ... from social infrastructure investments to generally/basically more complicated and riskier economic infrastructure projects.
I see no need for either, and would not use them, but if you choose to use one, I'd suggest "generally".



Thank you, FounDit. I thought that you need an adverb to not lose the meaning of tend to, that otherwise would not be conveyed in the modified expression ... to more complicated and riskier economic infrastructure projects. What do you think?
Carmenex
Posted: Monday, April 9, 2018 9:25:53 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,018
Neurons: 5,369
FounDit wrote:

Which of the adverbs in bold (if any) you think is the most appropriate in: ... from social infrastructure investments to generally/basically more complicated and riskier economic infrastructure projects.
I see no need for either, and would not use them, but if you choose to use one, I'd suggest "generally".



Thank you, FounDit. I thought that you need an adverb to express the meaning of tend, which otherwise could not be conveyed with the modified expression ... to more complicated and riskier economic infrastructure projects. What do you think?
FounDit
Posted: Monday, April 9, 2018 5:26:21 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,906
Neurons: 51,966
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:

Which of the adverbs in bold (if any) you think is the most appropriate in: ... from social infrastructure investments to generally/basically more complicated and riskier economic infrastructure projects.
I see no need for either, and would not use them, but if you choose to use one, I'd suggest "generally".



Thank you, FounDit. I thought that you need an adverb to express the meaning of tend, which otherwise could not be conveyed with the modified expression ... to more complicated and riskier economic infrastructure projects. What do you think?

I saw that description as being unnecessary to the main ideas. The fact that something "tends" or has a "tendency" to be a certain way simply means it has a predisposition for that.

That being so, I simply stated that as a fact rather than describing it as "tends" to be that way. Omitting it made the sentence shorter, but still left the ideas intact.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Monday, April 9, 2018 5:37:57 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,018
Neurons: 5,369
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:

Which of the adverbs in bold (if any) you think is the most appropriate in: ... from social infrastructure investments to generally/basically more complicated and riskier economic infrastructure projects.
I see no need for either, and would not use them, but if you choose to use one, I'd suggest "generally".



Thank you, FounDit. I thought that you need an adverb to express the meaning of tend, which otherwise could not be conveyed with the modified expression ... to more complicated and riskier economic infrastructure projects. What do you think?

I saw that description as being unnecessary to the main ideas. The fact that something "tends" or has a "tendency" to be a certain way simply means it has a predisposition for that.

That being so, I simply stated that as a fact rather than describing it as "tends" to be that way. Omitting it made the sentence shorter, but still left the ideas intact.


Thank you, FounDit, for the explanation. I agree with your reasoning.
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