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Nonsense Poems and Prose Options
Epiphileon
Posted: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 4:13:20 AM

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The Jabberwocky will probably ever be the epitome of this category, but I was wondering what other examples there might be. It may be a stretch to even say there is such a category, but I figured if there was anywhere I might find more, it would be here.

I thought of this question the other day after amazing the students on my bus with something my Dad used to befuddle my young mind with.

One dark day in the middle of the night,
two dead boys got up to fight.
Back to back they faced each other,
drew their swords and shot each other.
The deaf policemen who heard the noise,
came and shot those two dead boys.
If you don't believe this lie is true,
ask the blind man he saw it to.

Wow it turns out there is such a category, I did a search using the first line of this poem, and found a Wiki page "Nonsense Verse"

There is a longer version of the "Two Dead Boys" poem, an amusing tale of a tall midget, and even a reference to Vogon poetry, (third worst in the universe.)

Anyone know of others?

Question authority. How do you know, that you know, what you know?
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 4:38:17 AM

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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
The Cow
by Ogden Nash

The cow is of the bovine ilk;
One end is moo, the other, milk.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Articulate Dreamer
Posted: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 5:49:34 AM

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Thanks Epiphileon for rekindling an old passion.

JJ, nice one there, but methinks not all witty and irreverent verse is 'nonsense'. If it was, almost ALL of Ogden Nash's output would qualify, eh?

There has to be some sense of absurdity about the content. In fact Edward Lear and Lewis Carroll who excelled in this craft before it became a recognised genre, are often considered ancestors of the Theatre of the Absurd.

Here's one from my schooldays:

(Poet Unknown)

Down in the forest where the green bamboo grows,
There stood a brown ant on an elephant's toes.
Said the elephant to the ant, tears rolling down his eyes,
"Get off you bully! Find someone of your size!"

"...hold infinity in the palm of your hand and eternity in an hour"
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 6:37:31 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Epi -

I'm really surprised that the entire genre has thus far passed you by.

Word-play, riddles, neologisms, double meanings, puns etc. are all part of this genre - whose earliest written examples show up from Old English - the first recorded examples of the English language. In Middle English it reached it's zenith when "Wit" was considered a primary function of English.

This is probably because minstrels, 'fools', baladeers, pedlars, travellers, were always welcomed with excitement across a mainly rural country. Those who could entertain with the most nonsense were always sure of bed and food and shelter, and rose to be in demand. There were always some attached to the Court and often to private and powerful households. These familiar tropes explain the tumultous reception of Pilgirm's Progress.

By the time we get to Early Modern we have hundreds of examples - from the plethora of printed texts specifically from the world of the Theatre. There was - and still is - a huge distinction between slapstick or comedic roles and this of "wit" and 'fancy'.

The most prolific resource for those who aren't familiar with historical literature would probably be found in Shakespeare. Unfortunately though, many of the neologisms in Shakespeare have entered the English language so that many of those reading him 600 years later don't even know how side-splittingly innovative and witty these were to contemporary audiences. (The 'artisans' speeches in Midsummer Night's Dream had 'em rolling in the aisles back in the day, but seem a bit naive and just rather stupid to modern audiences.).

The 18thC - the days of Steele and Sheridan - brought us satire; and this form of wit for a time eclipsed the traditional forms. But then the great Victorian era dawned and "wit and nonsense" became the most popular kind of humour. Victorian children's books are a positive cornuccopia of nonsense-words, nonsense-poems, nonsense stories.

From Edward Lear to Spike Milligan, from theatre to TV panels shows, from Variety Shows to Monty Python, this integral part of our language is one of the aspects of English most prized, applauded, and laughter-provoking to BE speakers.

OK, so I guess you weren't expecting a history lesson - but this, to me, is a key factor in understanding the difference not just between British and American humour, but across the very dialects of BE and AE, (and which causes a lot of misunderstanding!)...which is a whole other subject with which I shan't bore anyone further!

FROSTY X RIME
Posted: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 11:40:05 AM

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Romany wrote:
Epi -

I'm really surprised that the entire genre has thus far passed you by.

Word-play, riddles, neologisms, double meanings, puns etc. are all part of this genre - whose earliest written examples show up from Old English - the first recorded examples of the English language. In Middle English it reached it's zenith when "Wit" was considered a primary function of English.




It's not "it's zenith". It should be "its zenith".
Romany, when are you going to give up harping on my English or other members' English with a malicious intention of belittling us when you need to improve yours?

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 1:45:57 PM

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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
FROSTY X RIME wrote:
Romany wrote:
Epi -

I'm really surprised that the entire genre has thus far passed you by.

Word-play, riddles, neologisms, double meanings, puns etc. are all part of this genre - whose earliest written examples show up from Old English - the first recorded examples of the English language. In Middle English it reached it's zenith when "Wit" was considered a primary function of English.




It's not "it's zenith". It should be "its zenith".
Romany, when are you going to give up harping on my English or other members' English with a malicious intention of belittling us when you need to improve yours?


Thanks!
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 3:24:35 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Oh for godsake, Frosty, When are you and Almo going to give up on abusing me and accusing me of evil thought and deed? Both of you have been doing it for yonks. Both of you have left - and in Almo's case at least it was because he was banned - and both came back and started again. Neither of you do it to any male posters. When I just ignore it you step up the action, and when I expostulate you attack me. It's been done to Hope - the only other female member who regularly posts. (And poor Koh has come in for dreadful abuse too).

"Harping on" about your English? Or anyone else's? "Malicious", "belittling"? You know what? Start throwing that kind of stuff at some of the male posters. Or is picking on women the only way you guys get your jollies? Act like real men.

dave argo
Posted: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 6:41:44 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/10/2016
Posts: 190
Neurons: 64,543
On a hot wintry day the emperor starkly naked,
with hands in it’s pockets, but quite ineffected:
Zenith of a genre, high wit in the nadir beneath.

John Bunyan of “The Pilgirm’s Progress” would,
Turn in his grave-and that’s no trope-if he could.
jacobusmaximus
Posted: Thursday, February 22, 2018 1:59:02 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/17/2009
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Location: Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom
Romany wrote:

Oh for godsake, Frosty, When are you and Almo going to give up on abusing me and accusing me of evil thought and deed? Both of you have been doing it for yonks. Both of you have left - and in Almo's case at least it was because he was banned - and both came back and started again. Neither of you do it to any male posters. When I just ignore it you step up the action, and when I expostulate you attack me. It's been done to Hope - the only other female member who regularly posts. (And poor Koh has come in for dreadful abuse too).

"Harping on" about your English? Or anyone else's? "Malicious", "belittling"? You know what? Start throwing that kind of stuff at some of the male posters. Or is picking on women the only way you guys get your jollies? Act like real men.





Oof!! Romany for PM! Step aside Theresa! Go home Boris!

I remember, therefore I am.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, February 22, 2018 4:21:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 41,647
Neurons: 395,487
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Frosty (and Almo),

your lash on Romany was unnecessary and rude. All of us make typos now and then, there's no need to snipe when you see one.

Rom is NOT belittling members who ask for help with their English. Some of your comments seem to be personal attacks, not fruitful discussion.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
almo 1
Posted: Thursday, February 22, 2018 4:58:07 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2016
Posts: 1,253
Neurons: 5,715
Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan

Yes.





Let's stop personal attacks.






Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, February 23, 2018 11:09:36 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,552
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Yes - it all goes back a long way.

Though Carroll - not only with Alice and the poems included in those books, but in his other verse - was a master, he was not the first.



The earliest pub called "Cat & Fiddle" was already open by 1590 - so the rhyme must have been well-known by then.

This one was registered and printed in broadsheet in 1588

I saw the man in the moon, fie, man, fie
I saw the man in the moon, who's the fool, now
I saw the man in the moon, Clouting of St. Peter's shoon
Thou hast well drunken, man, who's the fool, now

I saw the goose ring the hog, fie, man, fie
I saw the goose ring the hog, who's the fool, now
I saw the goose ring the hog, saw the snail bite the dog
Thou hast well drunken, man, who's the fool, now

I saw the hare chase the hound, fie, man, fie
I saw the hare chase the hound, who's the fool, now
I saw the hare chase the hound, Twenty miles above the ground
Thou hast well drunken, mn, who's the fool, now

I saw the mouse chase the cat, fie, man, fie
I saw the mouse chase the cat, who's the fool now
I saw the mouse chase the cat, Saw the cheese eat the rat
Thou hast well drunken, man, who's the fool now

I saw a flea heave a tree, fie, man, fie
I saw a flea heave a tree, who's the fool now
I saw a flea heave a tree, twenty miles out to sea
Thou hast well drunken, man, who's the fool now

I saw a maid milk a bull, fie, man, fie
I saw a maid milk a bull, who's the fool now
I saw a maid milk a bull, at every pull a bucket full
Thou hast well drunken, man, who's the fool now




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
IMcRout
Posted: Friday, February 23, 2018 4:28:37 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/27/2011
Posts: 35,204
Neurons: 546,023
Location: Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
One of my (English language)* favourites is a poem by John Lennon, taken from his book 'A Spaniard In The Works', (1965):

The Fat Budgie

I have a little budgie
He is my very pal
I take him walks in Britain
I hope I always shall.

I call my budgie Jeffrey
My grandads name's the same
I call him after grandad
Who had a feathered brain.

Some people don't like budgies
The little yellow brats
They eat them up for breakfast
Or give them to their cats.

My uncle ate a budgie
It was so fat and fair.
I cried and called him Ronnie
He didn't seem to care

Although his name was Arthur
It didn't mean a thing.
He went into a petshop
And ate up everything.

The doctors looked inside him,
To see what they could do,
But he had been too greedy
And died just like a zoo.

My Jeffrey chirps and twitters
When I walk into the room,
I make him scrambled egg on toast
And feed him with a spoon.

He sings like other budgies
But only when in trim
But most of all on Sunday
Thats when I plug him in.

He flies about the room sometimes
And sits upon my bed
And if he's really happy
He does it on my head.

He's on a diet now you know
From eating ear too much
They say if he gets fatter
He'll have to wear a crutch.

It would be funny wouldn't it
A budgie on a stick
Imagine all the people
Laughing till they're sick.

So that's my budgie Jeffrey
Fat and yellow too
I love him more than daddie
And I'm only thirty two.


* I know bundles in German, but like most poems, these are very hard to translate adequately. Maybe later. Think


I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Epiphileon
Posted: Saturday, February 24, 2018 4:59:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/22/2009
Posts: 4,006
Neurons: 66,646
Thank you very much everyone who chose to post on topic, I enjoyed reading all of them. Romany thanks for the overview, I have always appreciated your informative posts, as my education is heavily lopsided having almost entirely skipped the secondary level.

Frosty (SMH) What the hell?, Not only is your lash at Romany, harsh and rude, (there is no need for me to set myself as a judge of this, it is unmistakable in the context of this thread), but it is entirely off topic. This forum used to be a place for rational discussions, and edification. If all members would return to polite discourse, we may actually be able to re-foster the type of useful dialog that occurred here at one time.



Question authority. How do you know, that you know, what you know?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, February 25, 2018 4:07:56 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,552
Neurons: 170,289
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
In similar vein - particularly popular when I was young - is this style.

This is part of the biography of Professor Stanley Unwin.
Quote:

Stanley found his fame by accidend, this whole fame did come about because instead of use the fundermold of the basic Engly twentyfido to carry out a testy-testy 123 he did useit the corruptations gobeldygook Unwinese in some great folly.

Well, when the great boss men what reside way up and above the floor of the studio soundy worky men below did hearit this corruptatious testy testy recordy of the gibberish words and sacrilade of the Engly languid, yet clearly counjoury of the imagy it was. These great and powerful men did decideit that the maker of this strange languid would make a great comedie and giveit the opportunitode to turny and come over t'other side of the microphode, Oh yes!

It was with deep joy that Stan discoverode that he could make many toils the salary of a yeard, with one or three days of talky his Unwinese, and furtherly that his languid could make laughter amongst the peopload and giveit him opportunitodes to worky with great comedie ands such as Spike Milligan and Peter Sellers.

Unwin worked on the radiode and televode, untill became he a housey holdy name in the nineteen fiflies. He made the "Rotatey Diskers with Unwin" LP which includey many such once upon a titos and Unwin speaky on many a subjey. O yes!

As Stan's fame did grow, he made appearends in cameodes in the famous filems of the ear, such being "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" and "Carry on Regardless" and in numerode commercials of the televode.

In nineteeen hundy and sixty ade, Stanley did make his greatesd contributy to the musicold when he did narrade the concept album "Ogden's Nut Gone Flake" for the Small Faces, carrying the rythmold’n sound of self expressy-ho to infinny in the cosmos for sure. Deep joy.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
IMcRout
Posted: Sunday, February 25, 2018 5:01:05 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/27/2011
Posts: 35,204
Neurons: 546,023
Location: Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
Thank you Drag0. This reminds me of parts of my long-lost youth, when I enjoyed - among others - the music of the Small Faces, especially their album 'Ogdens' Nut Gone Flake', which included the story of Happiness Stan.

I love Unwinese, although I only understand about half of it, hobbery hobbery.

Here's his his rendition of that story.
Here's also a recording ('Just the words') with considerably better sound quality.

Edit: Oops. When I saw Unwin in Drag0nspeaker's post, my mind immediately carried me away back to the Sixties that I didn't even finish reading. I would have seen him mention that very thing. Sorry.

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Epiphileon
Posted: Monday, February 26, 2018 12:18:56 PM

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Neurons: 66,646
Thanks DragO and IMc,
There is of course this gem as well, "The Turboencabulator"


Question authority. How do you know, that you know, what you know?
RuthP
Posted: Monday, February 26, 2018 4:58:30 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

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Posts: 4,995
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Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
Better late than never, I hope. This poem is (obviously) a take-off on the nursery rhyme, "The House That Jack Built". There are many shorter poems in the book, but I found this one on line and it was too good to pass up. You can doubtless find others on line. I understand the book, originally published in the late 1950s, is back in print. I highly (highly) recommend it.
The Space Child’s Mother Goose
By Fredrick Winsor, illustrations by Marian Parry

This is the Theory Jack built.

This is the Flaw
That lay in the Theory Jack built.

This is the Mummery
Hiding the Flaw
That lay in the Theory Jack built.

This is the Summary
Based on the Mummery
Hiding the Flaw
That lay in the Theory Jack built.

This is Constant K
That saved the Summary
Based on the Mummery
Hiding the Flaw
That lay in the Theory Jack built.

This is the Erudite Verbal Haze
Cloaking Constant K
That saved the Summary
Based on the Mummery
Hiding the Flaw
That lay in the Theory Jack built.

This is the Turn of a Plausible Phrase
That thickened the Erudite Verbal Haze
Cloaking Constant K
That saved the Summary
Based on the Mummery
Hiding the Flaw
That lay in the Theory Jack built.

This is Chaotic Confusion and Bluff
That hung on the Turn of a Plausible Phrase
That thickened the Erudite Verbal Haze
Cloaking Constant K
That saved the Summary
Based on the Mummery
Hiding the Flaw
That lay in the Theory Jack built.

This is the Cybernetics and Stuff
That covered Chaotic Confusion and Bluff
That hung on the Turn of a Plausible Phrase
And thickened the Erudite Verbal Haze
Cloaking Constant K
That saved the Summary
Based on the Mummery
Hiding the Flaw
That lay in the Theory Jack built.

This is the Button to Start the Machine
To make with the Cybernetics and Stuff
To cover Chaotic Confusion and Bluff
That hung on the Turn of a Plausible Phrase
And thickened the Erudite Verbal Haze
Cloaking Constant K
That saved the Summary
Based on the Mummery
Hiding the Flaw
That lay in the Theory Jack built.

This is the Space Child with Brow Serene
Who pushed the Button to Start the Machine
That made with the Cybernetics and Stuff
Without Confusion, exposing the Bluff
That hung on the Turn of a Plausible Phrase
And, shredding the Erudite Verbal Haze
Cloaking Constant K
Wrecked the Summary
Based on the Mummery
Hiding the Flaw
And Demolished the Theory Jack built.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, February 26, 2018 9:20:32 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,552
Neurons: 170,289
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Applause Applause

It actually makes perfect sense! Dancing

***************

One of my favourites (after Red Riding Hood, in which the little girl shoots the wolf and makes him into a wolf-skin coat) is:
Quote:
The Three Little Pigs

The animal I really dig
Above all others is the pig.
Pigs are noble. Pigs are clever,
Pigs are corteous. However,
Now and then, to break this rule,
One meets a pig who is a fool.
What, for example, would you say
If strolling through the woods one day,
Right there in front of you you saw
A pig who'd built his house of STRAW?
The Wolf who saw it licked his lips,
And said, "That pig has had his chips."
"Little pig, little pig, let me come in!"
"No, no, by the hairs on my chinny-chin-chin!"
"Then I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house in!"

The little pig began to pray,
But Wolfie blew his house away.
He shouted, "Bacon, pork and ham!
Oh, what a lucky Wolf I am!"
And though he ate the pig quite fast,
He carefully kept the tail till last.
Wolf wandered on, a trifle bloated.
Surprise, surprise, for soon he noted
Another little house for pigs,
And this one had been built of TWIGS!

"Little pig, little pig, let me come in!"
"No, no, by the hairs on my chinny-chin-chin!"
"Then I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house in!"

The Wolf said, "Okay, here we go!"
He then began to blow and blow.
The little pig began to sqeal.
He cried, "Oh Wolf, you've had one meal!
Why can't we talk and make a deal?"
The Wolf replied, "Not on your nelly!"
And soon the pig was in his belly.
"Two juicy little pigs!" Wolf cried,
"But still I'm not quite satisfied!
I know how full my tummy's bulging,
But oh, how I adore indulging."
So creeping quietly as a mouse,
The Wolf approached another house,
A house which also had inside
A little piggy trying to hide.
But this one, Piggy Number Three,
Was bright and brainy as could be.
No straw for him, no twigs or sticks.
This pig had built his house of BRICKS.
"You'll not get me!" the Piggy cried.
"I'll blow you down!" the Wolf replied.
"You'll need," Pig said, "a lot of puff,
And I don't think you've got enough."
Wolf huffed and puffed and blew and blew.
The house stayed up as good as new.
"If I can't blow it down," Wolf said,
"I'll have to blow it up instead.
I'll come back in the dead of night
And blow it up with dynamite!"
Pig cried, "You brute! I might have known!"
Then, picking up the telephone,
He dialed as quickly as he could
The number of red Riding Hood.
"Hello," she said. "Who's speaking? Who?
Oh, hello, Piggy, how d'you do?"
Pig cried, "I need your help, Miss Hood!
Oh help me, please! D'you think you could?"
"I'll try of course," Miss Hood replied.
"What's on your mind...?" "A Wolf!" Pig cried.
"I know you've dealt with wolves before,
And now I've got one at my door!"
"My darling Pig," she said, "my sweet,
That's something really up my street.
I've just begun to wash my hair.
But when it's dry, I'll be right there."

A short while later, through the wood,
Came striding brave Miss Riding Hood.
The Wolf stood there, his eyes ablaze
And yellowish, like mayonnaise.
His teeth were sharp, his gums were raw,
And spit was dripping from his jaw.
Once more the maiden's eyelid flickers.
She draws the pistol from her knickers.
Once more she hits the vital spot,
And kills him with a single shot.
Pig, peeping through the window, stood
And yelled, "Well done, Miss Riding Hood!"

Ah, Piglet, you must never trust
Young ladies from the upper crust.
For now, Miss Riding Hood, one notes,
Not only has two wolfskin coats,
But when she goes from place to place
She has a PIGSKIN TRAVELLING CASE.


Roald Dahl, Revolting Rhimes

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, February 27, 2018 4:43:34 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 41,647
Neurons: 395,487
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
In Passion Play album by Jethro Tull there is an interlude:


The Story Of The Hare Who Lost His Spectacles


This is the story of the hare who lost his spectacles

Owl loved to rest quietly whilst no one was watching
Sitting on a fence one day, he was surprised when suddenly a kangaroo ran close by
Now this may not seem strange, but when Owl overheard Kangaroo whisper to no one in particular
"The hare has lost his spectacles," well, he began to wonder

Presently, the moon appeared from behind a cloud and there, lying on the grass was hare
In the stream that flowed by the grass a newt
And sitting astride a twig of a bush a bee

Ostensibly motionless, the hare was trembling with excitement
For without his spectacles he appeared completely helpless
Where were his spectacles? Could someone have stolen them?
Had he mislaid them? What was he to do?

Bee wanted to help, and thinking he had the answer began:
"You probably ate them thinking they were a carrot."
"No!" interrupted Owl, who was wise
"I have good eye-sight, insight, and foresight
How could an intelligent hare make such a silly mistake?"
But all this time, Owl had been sitting on the fence, scowling!

A Kangaroo were hopping mad at this sort of talk
She thought herself far superior in intelligence to the others
She was their leader, their guru. She had the answer:

"Hare, you must go in search of the optician."
But then she realized that Hare was completely helpless without his spectacles
And so, Kangaroo loudly proclaimed, "I can't send Hare in search of anything!"
"You can guru, you can!" shouted Newt
"You can send him with Owl."
But Owl had gone to sleep
Newt knew too much to be stopped by so small a problem
"You can take him in your pouch."
But alas, Hare was much too big to fit into Kangaroo's pouch

All this time, it had been quite plain to hare that the others knew nothing about spectacles


As for all their tempting ideas, well Hare didn't care
The lost spectacles were his own affair
And after all, Hare did have a spare a-pair
A-pair


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
TL Hobs
Posted: Saturday, March 31, 2018 8:06:57 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/16/2009
Posts: 1,391
Neurons: 5,526
Location: Kenai, Alaska, United States
Here is my 2 cents worth.....

The gum chewing boy and the cud chewing cow
are different, yet similar somehow.
Oh, what it is? I see it now!
It's the intelligent look on the face of the cow.

Unknown author.

From the Pop Up Biggest Book...

These Presidential heads in stone
are quite the largest ever known.
Their mouths, noses and eyeses
are 80 times their natural sizes.
If you dig heads, you'll get your quota
way out yonder in South Dakota.

"When you don't know where you are going, you have to stick together just in case someone gets there." - Ken Kesey
leonAzul
Posted: Friday, April 6, 2018 2:56:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,358
Neurons: 26,565
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
"I see!" said the blind carpenter, as he picked up his hammer and saw.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
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