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Do You Know about Obsolete English Words?(47) Options
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Wednesday, February 28, 2018 11:41:36 AM

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Joined: 8/3/2016
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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
Lexicographers often put an indication that so and so word has become obsolete.
Certain words are now obsolete like LUNTING, WITH A Squirrel, GOBBLEDYGOOK,, and GROAK.

Why do words get obsolete?


Do you know of some more such words?

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, February 28, 2018 3:12:23 PM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
I still use Gobbledygook as do people I know it's not obsolete.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, February 28, 2018 3:14:32 PM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!

Some words just have no common use now.
For example, words specific to the trades of hand-spinning and hand-weaving cotton. These would have been familiar to my great-grandparents, known to my grandparents - but obsolete now, except among people who learn the trades as a hobby.

Others were never very common, and children, over a couple of generations, would learn the more common ones they heard every day, but not the more unusual ones.
"Lunt" is a Scottish dialect word - it was never a common word in Britain, and I doubt it was in America either - except maybe in Nova Scotia and Dunedin, Florida.
With education increasing in the last hundred years, and people reading books written by 'standard English speakers', "smoke", "fume" and "reek" became THE words to use.

Gobbledygook is not obsolete - take a look at this thread.
Gobbledygook is alive and condriving in its usingness - deep joy! Dancing

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Gary98
Posted: Wednesday, February 28, 2018 4:15:34 PM

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Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Word like phlogiston from wrong idea or theory will die out. Creationism as a word will last forever here in the USA. Gobbledygook is the liveliest of them three.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, February 28, 2018 4:24:07 PM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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What words do you use to describe a word that has died out or has been replaced?
Archaic or obsolete.

And what dead languages do those two words come from? Ancient Greek and Latin. There must be a moral in there somewhere! Whistle
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, March 1, 2018 3:38:06 AM

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Joined: 9/21/2009
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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Methinks snowbroth will come back into use these days ;-)



In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Sanmayce
Posted: Sunday, March 4, 2018 8:56:43 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
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Neurons: 23,760
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Ashwin Joshi wrote:

Why do words get obsolete?


No such thing exists as getting obsolete, simply there are, outside this world, myriads of words, existing INDEPENDENTLY from living beings (not only Human beings).
Those words are waiting in the wings (Logos), we just reveal their existence. If a master dictionary existed, housing all the words ever used, then people would refrain from saying the blasphemy - dying words, nothing dies - just returns to the source, unused.

Currently, I am wrestling with the richest corpus of words used by Internet users - REDDIT.COM (a 2TB strong JSON dump)- it features far more than 100,000,000 unique words - most of them being just a "junk", nevertheless, my intention is to share it when done as a part of the incoming Schizandrafield 1-gram Corpus, to be greatly enriched by 20 more major corpora as CNN stories, Daily Mail stories, English Wikimedia, Project Gutenberg, Hacker News, British National Corpus, UseNet corpus, ISTA (Internet Sacred Texts Archive), StackExchange (all groups, 260GB strong), ... After some weeks, the richest wordlist on Internet will be downloadable from Masakari thread.

The More The Merrier, all corpora are to be cherished and preserved - they are invaluable snapshot/heritage of our culture, bypassing/overlooking them is sheer ignorance, hate such "trends" of being modern and not looking back. See my signature!

My humble persona will do everything in my power to offer one amateurish attempt to have such master corpus of 1-grams - as a plain text file - i.e. easily searchable.

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Sanmayce
Posted: Sunday, March 4, 2018 7:52:23 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 354
Neurons: 23,760
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Regarding ever-presented words appearing to us as our invention/work:



“The sculpture is already complete within the marble block, before I start my work. It is already there, I just have to chisel away the superfluous material.”
― Michelangelo Buonarroti

We just "create" what is already there in this sacred container - the Logos.

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Ebenezer Son
Posted: Monday, March 26, 2018 2:16:01 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/23/2013
Posts: 683
Neurons: 3,245
[quote=Drag0nspeaker]Hi!

Some words just have no common use now.
For example, words specific to the trades of hand-spinning and hand-weaving cotton. These would have been familiar to my great-grandparents, known to my grandparents - but obsolete now, except among people who learn the trades as a hobby.

Others were never very common, and children, over a couple of generations, would learn the more common ones they heard every day, but not the more unusual ones.
"Lunt" is a Scottish dialect word - it was never a common word in Britain, and I doubt it was in America either - except maybe in Nova Scotia and Dunedin, Florida.
With education increasing in the last hundred years, and people reading books written by 'standard English speakers', "smoke", "fume" and "reek" became THE words to use.

Gobbledygook is not obsolete - take a look at this thread.
Gobbledygook is alive and condriving in its usingness - deep joy! Dancing [/quote

H1 Dragon a po1nt of quest1on, 1 was th1nk1ng you would have used usage 1nstead of (us1ngness). What have you got to say?

I know only one thing - that is that I know nothing.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, March 27, 2018 2:28:29 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,949
Neurons: 174,377
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Ebenezner Son wrote:
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Gobbledygook is alive and condriving in its usingness - deep joy! Dancing

H1 Dragon a po1nt of quest1on, 1 was th1nk1ng you would have used usage 1nstead of (us1ngness). What have you got to say?

Hi!
"Condriving", usingness" and "deep joy!" are examples of the type of gobbledegook used by Professor Stanley Unwin.
Take a look at the two posts of the 25th of February in this thread.
Dancing

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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