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acronym Options
D00M
Posted: Saturday, March 10, 2018 6:57:37 AM

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Hello respected teachers,

Is "ATM" an acronym? What about "CD"?

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
hedy mmm
Posted: Saturday, March 10, 2018 9:04:32 AM

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Yes DOOM, ATM is an acronym for Automated Teller Machines, however, CD has 243 acronyms...d'oh!
the first three acronyms are Compact Disc, Certificate of Deposit and Civil Defense..

hedy

"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
Bedells
Posted: Saturday, March 10, 2018 9:23:27 AM

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I found this topic interesting since I wasn't sure about the difference between abbreviation and acronym. I discovered that ATM is actually an initialism (A new word for my vovabulary Anxious )

This is the link for the full article
D00M
Posted: Saturday, March 10, 2018 10:04:41 AM

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hedy mmm wrote:
Yes DOOM, ATM is an acronym for Automated Teller Machines, however, CD has 243 acronyms...d'oh!
the first three acronyms are Compact Disc, Certificate of Deposit and Civil Defense..

hedy


Thank you.

But if that's the case, why there are distinct definition for abbreviations that are pronounced as individual letters, ATM being one example, and those that are pronounced as a words.

See:
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/initialism
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/acronym

So, according to Oxford dictionary, ATM is not an acronym, but an initialism.

Would you please shed some light on this issue.


The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
thar
Posted: Saturday, March 10, 2018 10:46:18 AM

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If you know the answer, and you are right, you don't need to ask.

Technically, only something like NATO ("nay-toe") is an acronym.

In practice, the word 'acronym' is used as a general term for using initial letters.

Outside of grammar books, nobody commonly uses the term 'initialism'. Hence Hedy's answer. They are the initial letters of the words.

So, technically, CD is an initialism. Give that answer in an English exam. It is correct.

But in normal speech, if you call it an initialism, most people will ask what you mean or offer you a tissue for your sneeze. Whistle
D00M
Posted: Saturday, March 10, 2018 11:51:51 AM

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thar wrote:
If you know the answer, and you are right, you don't need to ask.



Thanks for your answer thar, I asked the question to make sure that English teachers will approve of my understanding.

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
D00M
Posted: Saturday, March 10, 2018 1:33:48 PM

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Someone told me that CD is an acronym because it can be treated as word; for example we can say "CDs".

Is there such a rule concerning an acronym?

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Saturday, March 10, 2018 2:31:43 PM

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D00M wrote:
Someone told me that CD is an acronym because it can be treated as word; for example we can say "CDs".

Is there such a rule concerning an acronym?


CD is not an acronym, because we don't pronounce it as a word. Instead, we simply pronounce each letter present, as in "C" "D", and when someone speaks of multiples, then "C" "D"s -- still not a word.

CICS is an acronym, because we read & pronounce that as "kicks".
Think NASA and SCUBA. There are many.
Peter O'Connor - Dundalk
Posted: Saturday, March 10, 2018 5:26:01 PM

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Yes
D00M
Posted: Sunday, March 11, 2018 11:39:45 AM

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Thank you all.

But why does George Yule in his book (the Study of Language) says that CD is an acronym?

"Acronyms are new words formed from the initial letters of a set of other words. These
can be forms such as CD (“compact disk”)
or VCR (“video cassette recorder”) where
the pronunciation consists of saying each separate letter. More typically, acronyms are
pronounced as new single words, as in NATO, NASA or UNESCO. These examples
have kept their capital letters, but many acronyms simply become everyday terms such
as laser (“light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation”), radar (“radio
detecting and ranging”), scuba (“self-contained underwater breathing apparatus”)
and zip (“zone improvement plan”) code. You might even hear talk of a snafu,
which is reputed to have its origins in “situation normal, all fouled up,” though there
is some dispute about the appropriate f-word in there.
Names for organizations are often designed to have their acronym represent an
appropriate term, as in “mothers against drunk driving” (MADD) and “women against
rape” (WAR). Some new acronyms come into general use so quickly that many
speakers do not think of their component meanings. Innovations such as the ATM
(“automatic teller machine”) and the required PIN (“personal identification number”)
are regularly used with one of their elements repeated, as in I sometimes forget my PIN
number when I go to the ATM machine."


Is it wrong? Or is not the book really technical?

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
hedy mmm
Posted: Monday, March 12, 2018 2:53:28 PM

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Location: Borough of Bronx, New York, United States
Please DOOM, Don't rack your brains over this...I was right from the get go. d'oh!
And I've been vindicated by George Yule! Whistle
What he stated IS TRUE...

DOOM you have great instincts Applause ...and thar concurs Applause ...trust yourself
hedy

Here's a good ACRONYM that also has numbers:

WD40
In 1953, a fledgling business called Rocket Chemical Company and its staff of three set out to create a line of rust-prevention solvents and degreasers for use in the aerospace industry. It took them 40 attempts to perfect their formula. The original secret formula for WD-40—which stands for Water Displacement, 40th attempt—is still in use today. What a story of persistence!




"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
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