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With temperature Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Monday, March 5, 2018 7:35:30 AM
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Wednesday was officially the hottest day since 1976, with temperatures hitting a toasty 33.9C in London.

https://www.google.co.uk/amp/metro.co.uk/2017/06/21/uk-records-hottest-june-day-since-1976-at-33-... /

Is "with temperature..." a prepositional phrase? What is it's grammatically function in the context?
Kirill Vorobyov
Posted: Monday, March 5, 2018 8:33:26 AM

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Well, I am not a grammarian, and even less so an English one, but since nobody seems to be particularly keen on responding to this I'll dare to contribute my penny thought.

If I were in my school years and faced with that question I would have guessed it's a conjunction. d'oh!
No guarantee.

Like in: That was a beautiful day, with the waves lapping at our feet and the sun shining in the sky.
It seems to connect matters that are connected only logically, they could have been said in separate sentences as well. I guess this is what conjunctions do. Think
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, March 5, 2018 8:34:28 AM

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Yes - it seems to be a rather long version of this 'grammatical form'.

with
- prep
3. used in descriptions
You can use with immediately after a noun phrase to mention a physical feature that someone or something has.
He was an old man with a beard.
They lived in a house with white walls and a red roof.

Collins COBUILD English Usage

The noun-phrase before 'with' is "the hottest day since 1976".
The feature that particular day had was "temperatures hitting a toasty 33.9C in London".

I could see it being thought of as an adjectival phrase modifying "day" or maybe "Wednesday".
This would definitely be the case in the simple "He was a man with a red beard".

However, in your sentence, it looks to me a bit more like an adverb, as it explains a bit more about the whole first clause "Wednesday was officially the hottest day".

EDITED to add:
Kirill answered first and is not very wrong.

I looked up the grammar-books on conjunctions and prepositions while I was answering.
One Canadian Educational website said "prepositions glue nouns to sentences, conjunctions can glue other types of words and phrases together" - so they are very similar and do the same sort of job.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Monday, March 5, 2018 8:36:49 AM
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Thanks
NKM
Posted: Monday, March 5, 2018 2:08:07 PM

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Yes indeed, "with" is a conjunction. Often, as in this case, it is followed by a plural noun to start a descriptive phrase.

- "with temperatures over 100°F"
- "with winds approaching gale force"
- "with waves 12 feet tall"
- "with disastrous results"


Jigneshbharati
Posted: Monday, March 5, 2018 4:38:55 PM
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Thanks
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, March 6, 2018 3:04:06 AM

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NKM wrote:
Yes indeed, "with" is a conjunction. 


Incredible! The three TFD dictionaries and the Oxford and Cambridge agree that "with" can only ever be a preposition.

Is there such a thing as a "conjunctive preposition"? - a word connecting a whole clause or long phrase (which happens to be acting as a noun) to a sentence.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, March 7, 2018 5:57:45 PM

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Of course it's really a preposition, though I'm not convinced that that definition prevents it from functioning as a conjunction.

Hope123
Posted: Thursday, March 8, 2018 10:13:30 AM

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This is an interesting question. Where's Leon when you need him?

If it's going to function as a conjunction, then they need to lose the comma. Otherwise it looks like some intricate construction in apposition.

Subordinate clauses at the end of a sentence do not use a comma.

Btw, prepositions take the "ing" form.

Elitism is the slur directed at merit by mediocrity. -Sydney J. Harris, journalist (14 Sep 1917-1986)
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