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belong with Options
anonymous
Posted: Friday, May 25, 2012 10:23:19 AM
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Is "belong with" exactly the same as "belong to" in "you belong with me"?
In general, is there actually any difference between "belong to" and "belong with" ?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, May 25, 2012 10:35:34 AM

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There is a big difference (even though it is only a small word!)

"You belong with me" means "We were meant to be together." - it means the same as "I belong with you.".
It answers "Where is the right place for you?" - "With me."
Quote:
belong VERB

1 [intransitive] + adverb/preposition
to be in the right or suitable place
Where do these plates belong (= where are they kept)?
Are you sure these documents belong together?
Several of the points you raise do not belong in this discussion.
A person like that does not belong in teaching.


"You belong to me." means "I have bought you. You are my slave." - it means the opposite to "I belong to you." ("I am your slave."). It answers "Who owns you" - "I own you."
Quote:
belong to somebody

to be owned by somebody
Who does this watch belong to?
The islands belong to Spain.


Both quotes are from the Oxford Dictionary.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Yakcal
Posted: Friday, May 25, 2012 9:15:09 PM

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There is a big difference just as DragOnspeaker points out; but don't forget that there can be some romance in the "belong to" phrase even though it may not seem like it until you think about it for a second.

How about, "My heart belongs to you." There is nothing there that smacks of slavery except perhaps that she has made him her love slave! Now that doesn't sound too bad at all.

Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. -Oscar Wilde
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, May 25, 2012 10:24:22 PM

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I can accept some romance in the phrase:

"I belong to you." or "My heart belongs to you."

However somehow "You belong to me." just doesn't have the same 'ring' to it.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Yakcal
Posted: Friday, May 25, 2012 10:30:26 PM

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Oh, there's no question about that. The possessiveness in that phrase is too much for me; but I have seen it used in heated scenes in both movies and books.

I think it all comes down to context.

Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. -Oscar Wilde
Romany
Posted: Friday, May 25, 2012 10:38:04 PM
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Speaking as a womean? Context be damned! Any time I hear that phrase it makes the hackles on my back rise - and any bloke who has ever been misguided enough to use it around me gets his marching papers just to prove that I'm well into emancipation of the serfs.
IMcRout
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2012 2:24:47 AM

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Reminds me of an article about Pidgin English and the many functions of 'belong', which I found in an old English reader.

"Belong means of, or belonging to, or any relation to. ...".
"Bandage is another word with lots of meanings. Originally it meant bandage for a wound, but it grew in use to mean a protective surrounding, even a fence round the house. ..."

So, what do you think is the difference between a bandage belong milk and a bandage belong jug belong milk?

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
anonymous
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2012 2:25:37 AM
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Thank you Drag0nspeaker, Now I see it is much better or let's say more romantic to say "You belong with me", but when talking about ourselves we can say "I belong to you", Now I think when people say "you belong to me" they actually want to sound romantic and they don'y really mean it! :-)
Romany
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2012 10:58:36 AM
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Dispela sampting 'bandage bilong milik' - oli callim 'bra'... n'est ce pas?
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2012 11:10:39 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I can accept some romance in the phrase:

"I belong to you." or "My heart belongs to you."

However somehow "You belong to me." just doesn't have the same 'ring' to it.


Unless its Patsy Cline saying it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PA7rxBWBxsY


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
IMcRout
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2012 2:15:44 PM

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Oui, c'est vrai, Romany.

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2012 6:55:34 PM

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Hello again anonymous.

Yes - it depends which way round you say it.

"I belong to you", "My heart belongs to you." are fine (It is your choice to belong to someone).

"You belong to me." sounds possessive and arrogant.

I think you are right, possibly people just say the wrong thing!

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Sunday, May 27, 2012 1:25:56 AM
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(off tpoic )Bochy -
actually, the accepted collocation is BANUS (meanung 'fence') bilong milik
IMcRout
Posted: Sunday, May 27, 2012 3:23:17 AM

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(still off topic)
Romany, I was taught that there are almost as many different forms of Pidgin English as there are peoples who speak it / them.

My quote was from an early 70s BBC broadcast by somebody called Dr. Puddy and it mentioned people from New Guinea.

I suspect natives of the West Indies, Nigeria or Indochina have different 'fences'

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Romany
Posted: Sunday, May 27, 2012 9:10:46 AM
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Bocy - well, actually PNG Pidgin (there is no New Guinea any more!) is my 3rd language - have been speaking it fluently since the age of 14. And, truly, it's banus bilong milik.
IMcRout
Posted: Sunday, May 27, 2012 9:53:11 AM

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I like milik.

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, May 27, 2012 10:05:44 AM

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Isn't that what they make cous-cous from?


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
coag
Posted: Sunday, May 27, 2012 1:19:38 PM

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1


Might there be nuances in the meaning and use in American and British
English?

In addition to FounDit's example there are:
You belong to me, Carly Simon
You belong with me, Taylor Swift

Webster
2b : to be attached or bound by birth, allegiance, or dependency —usually
used with to <they belong to their homeland>

2
---

In Mathematics we say: the element x belongs to the set S.
Alternatively (1): x is in S
Alternatively (2): x is a member of S

'Belongs to' here does not imply ownership. The element x can also belong to
another set, say T, therefore we cannot say S owns x.

3
---

Etymology on line

belong (v.)
mid-14c., "to go along with, properly relate to," from be- intensive
prefix, + longen "to go," from O.E. langian "pertain to, to go along with,"
of unknown origin. Senses of "be the property of" and "be a member of"
first recorded late 14c. Cognate with M.Du. belanghen, Du. belangen, Ger.
belangen. Replaced earlier O.E. gelang, with completive prefix ge-.
Kamlesh Kalvaniya
Posted: Tuesday, February 13, 2018 8:01:46 AM

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Location: Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
Here what I feel:

Belong to: to show ownership or possession of sth/sb.

Belong with: to show that sth/sb has same characteristics and qualities as others so it has to be put with them.

Thank you!
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