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Ray Bradbury and the poetry of science fiction Options
DavidScott
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2012 7:05:18 AM
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I have Rogermue in mind as I introduce this topic. I have little doubt that he has read Bradbury's works, in particular, "The Martian Chronicles" and "Something Wicked This Way Comes." It has been many years since I've read these, but I invite discussion of these masterpieces, and hope to see how others respond to this topic.










excaelis
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2012 6:55:57 PM

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I re-read ' The Martian Chronicles ' about a month ago, then went through most of his short fiction. I love his Irish stories perhaps the best. What I love about RB is his ability to hold the reader's attention while telling stories where not so much happens. Gabriel Garcia Marquez has the same gift.

Sanity is not statistical
almostfreebird
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2012 8:27:32 PM

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I read "Something Wicked This Way Comes" when I was a child and I was drawn into his world.

Although it is a Japanese version, the translation is excellent and does not detract from Bradbury world.






DavidScott
Posted: Sunday, May 27, 2012 5:03:12 PM
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I don't specifically recall his Irish stories, but then, it's been years since I read his works.
Freebird...it's quite a gift when a writer can translate some like Bradbury and convey the beauty of the language. Ex mentioned Marquez: whoever translated his works into English had that gift, as I had that feeling of Marquez speaking directly to me in my own language. (I should pick up one of his books in Spanish sometime and see how much of it I can make out with my limited Spanish skills!)
redgriffin
Posted: Wednesday, June 6, 2012 11:52:54 AM

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I have just heard that Ray has left us at the young age of 91. Ray was a passionate advocate for the common man what struck me about he writing was that in each of his stories you could see a humanness that was sometimes lacking in the real world. RIP Ray you will be missed in this world you've gone at a time when we seem to need your wit and insight more then ever.
IMcRout
Posted: Wednesday, June 6, 2012 12:06:04 PM

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I introduced Fahrenheit 451 to my students, as an example of science fiction and to show them how totalitarianism can work.

RIP Ray Bradbury.

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Epiphileon
Posted: Wednesday, June 6, 2012 12:08:13 PM

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Ray was one of the great Sci/Fi writers, and although I preferred hard SF, I enjoyed "Dandelion Wine", and "The Illustrated Man", immensely.

Question authority. How do you know, that you know, what you know?
DavidScott
Posted: Wednesday, June 6, 2012 1:35:15 PM
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How odd that we had just been thinking of him. I wasn't actually sure if he was still alive, but I certainly had no recollection of his having died. This is very sad, but of course, he lived 91 beautiful years. May his soul fly forever through the Universes he created, as well the Universe itself. Goodbye dear man.
redgriffin
Posted: Wednesday, June 6, 2012 7:21:02 PM

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My favorite Bradbury Book was "Something Wicked This Was Comes" At first because it was a ghost story and then it was a story of a father and son growing together in life and lastly it was about growing old and the fear that we as human beings have of it. One of my only beefs I had with him was over e books he thought they were a waste of time and I see them as a way to introduce a new generation to books also it is the best way to take books off the planet. Good Bye Ray who will be our conscious now?
excaelis
Posted: Wednesday, June 6, 2012 7:56:25 PM

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Dark they were, and golden-eyed...

Sanity is not statistical
thar
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2012 2:14:03 AM

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Certainly not many writers (especially scienc fiction writers) get this response.

Quote:
For Immediate Release June 06, 2012 Statement by the President on the Passing of Ray Bradbury

For many Americans, the news of Ray Bradbury's death immediately brought to mind images from his work, imprinted in our minds, often from a young age. His gift for storytelling reshaped our culture and expanded our world. But Ray also understood that our imaginations could be used as a tool for better understanding, a vehicle for change, and an expression of our most cherished values. There is no doubt that Ray will continue to inspire many more generations with his writing, and our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends.


Bradbury drives Mars rover at JPL

and talking at a Caltech symposium in the 1970s, with poetry reading. A really numble and funny guy Dancing Dancing Applause Applause
If only we had taller been
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2012 2:25:58 AM

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I was fascinated by Fahrenheit 451 when I read it as a teenager (the year it was written) - then years later, I started to notice things from it happening in real life...

"He did things to the world. The world was bankrupted of ten million fine actions the night he passed on."
Fahrenheit 451.

"Stuff your eyes with wonder, live as if you'd drop dead in ten seconds. See the world. It's more fantastic than any dream made or paid for in factories."
Fahrenheit 451

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
DavidScott
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2012 5:46:07 AM
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Great quotes, Dragon, although I don't recall them. I'll have to go to the library, it has been many years since I lost most of my books...divorce does things to one which we could never foresee.Boo hoo!
thar...may I tease you? I'll need to take time later to check your links, but I don't believe "numble" is a word...or is it?Whistle
thar
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2012 6:59:37 AM

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sorry, David, a couple of words of Martian slip into my posts occasionally when time streams collide. Numble is not a word. Yet.....Drool
DavidScott
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2012 9:13:12 AM
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thar wrote:
sorry, David, a couple of words of Martian slip into my posts occasionally when time streams collide. Numble is not a word. Yet.....Drool


HAHAHAHA! It hadn't occurred to me that te word was martian, I shoulda thunk harder!Applause Eh?

Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2012 10:03:54 AM

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Doing is Being

Ray Bradbury


Doing is being.
To have done’s not enough.
To stuff yourself with doing — that’s the game.
To name yourself each hour by what’s done,
To tabulate your time at sunset’s gun
And find yourself in acts
You could not know before the facts
You wooed from secret self, which much needs wooing,
So doing brings it out,
Kills doubt by simply jumping, rushing, running
Forth to be
The new-discovered me.
To not do is to die,
Or lie about and lie about the things
You just might do some day.
Away with that!
Tomorrow empty stays
If no man plays it into being
With his motioned way of seeing.
Let your body lead your mind –
Blood the guide dog to the blind;
So then practice and rehearse
To find heart-soul’s universe,
Knowing that by moving/seeing
Proves for all time: Doing’s being!




In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
RuthP
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2012 11:20:31 AM

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Epiphileon wrote:
Ray was one of the great Sci/Fi writers, and although I preferred hard SF, I enjoyed "Dandelion Wine", and "The Illustrated Man", immensely.

Ditto. Primarily a hard-science science fiction fan from the beginning, when I first read Bradbury I was caught by his writing. The words flow and the writing is so very beautiful; I couldn't stop reading. I think Dandelion Wine, which is poetry in prose, beautiful. I'm pretty sure it was the first story of his I read. (No, not a prose-poem; I'm not so literary.)

Ray Bradbury spoke to both future hope in humanity and dread for what we could do. Among many other things it speaks to, The Martian Chronicles certainly spoke to the nuclear angst of my childhood. The dark and the light inside us fills the stories of The Illustrated Man.

Fun factoid: I always associated the book-burning totalitarianism of WW II and the Nazis with the story in Fahrenheit 451. I later discovered Bradbury was describing a future ruled by television. He saw us as rejecting books for the easier sound bites and instant reinforcement of TV; we are the totalitarian book-burners.
DavidScott
Posted: Friday, June 8, 2012 7:46:18 AM
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Thank you, JJ, I had never read that. Would you steer me to it's source?
Ruth...The Martian Chronicles, in particular, spoke of the meanness of the human spirit. I recall the utter disrespect of the humans for the ancient, and profound, society who still existed there, if only in memory. I also recall that all of the black race of humans left, to the very last one, when the opportunity arose for them to get on rocketships and leave the earth, and its highly biased society...poignant moments, I still cry at the mere mention of some of these...
TYSON
Posted: Friday, June 8, 2012 8:31:40 AM

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My introduction to Ray Bradbury was in primrary school. I was in grade 4 or 5. It was the movie "Something Wicked This Way Comes." I thought it was pretty cool and creepy. Years later I began to read science fiction (and still do). Bradbury was one of the names I began to remember as amongst the short stories I enjoyed a little more than the others. Farenheit 451 was the first novel I read of his. It was recomended to me by an uncle's friend. Loved it.


I think therefore I think I am
RuthP
Posted: Friday, June 8, 2012 1:28:04 PM

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DavidScott wrote:
Thank you, JJ, I had never read that. Would you steer me to it's source?
Ruth...The Martian Chronicles, in particular, spoke of the meanness of the human spirit. I recall the utter disrespect of the humans for the ancient, and profound, society who still existed there, if only in memory. I also recall that all of the black race of humans left, to the very last one, when the opportunity arose for them to get on rocketships and leave the earth, and its highly biased society...poignant moments, I still cry at the mere mention of some of these...

I do agree. The humans who came to Mars did to the Martians what those left on Earth did to Earth: destroyed them/it. Bradbury once said (well, he probably said it more than once) that he wrote about things in the hope they wouldn't happen. I feel like that lesson was intended to apply to both individuals and society. Somehow, we needed to take the lesson that we all, individually and collectively thoughtlessly destroy things, things as serious as the world, another people, humans who are 'different'.
DavidScott
Posted: Friday, June 8, 2012 4:42:56 PM
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Farenheit 451 was more "hard" sci-fi than many other of Bradbury's works, and may be one which secured his status forever as a great member of the sci-fi community. The movie was brilliant, or so I say after these many, many years since I saw it, and immensely prophetic. In particular, his vision of a world wherein "the internet" was pervasive strikes me now as presient. Do any of you recall the woman in front of a wall-sized television, watching what was intentionally presented as a schlocky daytime soap opera, and the characters, at one point, turning to the woman and asking her, by name, for her opinion of the situation at hand? Interactive television...a concept none of us would have dreamed would be possible for another century or 2, and yet it is here. Dick Tracy's watch/tv/telephone is also here already, but that's another "seer's" prediction.
Was the movie much like the book? I hope so. I haven't read the book in many years, but it seems the movie was a good representation of it.
While I'm getting on my soap box, I'll mention one other film, and that was The Illustrated Man. Scary. Mesmerizing. A classic. Well ahead of its time.
excaelis
Posted: Friday, June 8, 2012 11:36:30 PM

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I wanted to post a link to full text Bradbury stories, but couldn't find one. I can't tell you how much pleasure I've derived from reading his short fiction, and I'd urge anyone who hasn't explored it to dive in. A glorious talent.

Sanity is not statistical
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, August 1, 2012 8:00:48 PM

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I haven't tried this - but it does say "Click here to read in your browser." (just click on the book cover)



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, August 1, 2012 8:07:09 PM

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Ray Bradbury - "Take me Home"


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
almo 1
Posted: Friday, December 8, 2017 10:49:25 PM
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capitán
Posted: Tuesday, December 26, 2017 11:18:11 PM

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almostfreebird wrote:


I read "Something Wicked This Way Comes" when I was a child and I was drawn into his world.

Although it is a Japanese version, the translation is excellent and does not detract from Bradbury world.








I really envy you. I have been studying Japanese for so many years and I still get such a hard time trying to read novels.
I am reading the little prince right now.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, February 6, 2018 6:52:46 AM

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Sadly, another of the world's great authors died last week.

Ursula LeGuin, author of the Earthsea cycle and The Left Hand of Darkness aged 88.

I was inspired by A Wizard of Earthsea in the 1960s - not only by the dragon (who inspired the concept of Dragonspeaking) but by the wizard himself as a boy and young man.

Ursula LeGuin was a graduate in Renaissance literature and it influenced her style - which, for me, makes the books very easy to read somehow.
Her personal philosophy grew from a fusion of the Tao and Jung's 'continuous creation' concept - not really 'pushed' in the books I have read, though her tendency towards anarchism (or, more correctly, away from strictly-organised '-archisms') is well-aired in The Disposessed and other stories.

Very much a leader in her field, and a great writer all through her life.

Dragons are more dangerous, and a good deal commoner, than bears.
Fantasy is nearer to poetry, to mysticism, and to insanity than naturalistic fiction is.
It is a real wilderness, and those who go there should not feel too safe.

— Ursula K. Le Guin


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, February 6, 2018 8:08:35 AM

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“People who deny the existence of dragons are often eaten by dragons. From within.”

“When you light a candle, you also cast a shadow.”

“What sane person could live in this world and not be crazy?”

- Ursula K. Le Guin


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
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