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Why I’ve thought sometimes if one but tried, here among th’ colliers even Options
vkhu
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 12:20:47 PM
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Quote:
‘Tell me you want a child, in hope!’ she murmured, pressing her face against his belly. ‘Tell me you do!’

‘Why!’ he said at last: and she felt the curious quiver of changing consciousness and relaxation going through his body. ‘Why I’ve thought sometimes if one but tried, here among th’ colliers even! They’re workin’ bad now, an’ not earnin’ much. If a man could say to ’em: Dunna think o’ nowt but th’ money. When it comes ter wants, we want but little. Let’s not live for money — ’

The excerpt comes from here: https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/l/lawrence/dh/l41l/chapter15.html

Context: The lady (Connie) is convincing the man (Mellors) to have a child with her. Just be for this part, Mellors express his pessimism view of the world, and is doubtful of giving birth to a child in such a world.

I honestly can't work out what the sentence in bold means. So Mellors think if one just try, then even if he's living among the colliers, he... what? The sentence just end right there, without elaborating on what will happen if one try.

And for that matter, what exactly should one "try"? Having a kid?
thar
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 12:26:35 PM

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No, he is talking about changing the attitude of society.

If a person could just try - even among the poorly-paid miners....
vkhu
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 12:33:55 PM
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But then it wouldn't have any consistency with what Connie said. She was begging him to reconsider having a child, yet on and on he went about society changes.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 12:40:49 PM

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But to him the change is bad.


That is why in a rapidly-industrialising postwar world he has chosen to hide away in the woods doing an old-fashioned job.


Why would he want to bring a child into such a cold, money-obsessed, heartless world?
thar
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 12:40:50 PM

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But to him the change is bad.


That is why in a rapidly-industrialising postwar world he has chosen to hide away in the woods doing an old-fashioned job.


Why would he want to bring a child into such a cold, money-obsessed, heartless world?
vkhu
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 12:47:11 PM
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I guess that makes sense. Thank you for your help.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 1:32:28 PM
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EDITED TO SAY: - When I posted I seem to have lost the first couple of lines, so forgive if it sounds like I've started abruptly)

.......But I think you were a little too quick to question it, because it's explained further down. In order to keep the reader engaged a writer will fail to explain something that happens so that the reader *will* be a little confused/worried...and will keep reading on looking for an explanation.

So well done on "taking the bait" i.e. in seeing that something was a bit strange, and for questioning it! It made you feel a little uneasy that he just continued burbling.

So now you and one of the characters are sharing an emotion; for if you read down the page a bit you'll find that it made Connie very uneasy too!

She also thought it rather weird that he should not address what she said.

"He had talked so long now, and he was really talking to himself not to her. Despair seemed to come down on him completely..."

She realises he's in some sort of fugue state: and that he didn't even consciously hear what she said.

See - although you and I (and we aren't alone - I remember another poster agreeing) can't bear the wretched book and only read it because we had to, *this* is all part of why it's part of the Canon; and why luckless students are made to wade through it kicking and protesting.

He *IS* a master of his craft. It's the skills he employs as a writer that the book exemplifies. How he structures it and builds characters up and surprises us and so on. But if you haven't had that explained by your teacher I can't understand for a single second why s/he would submit you to such torture!!

(For future reading of masters of their craft I refer you to Stephen King. He is academically sound - lectures and writes about language - as well as making the hair stand up on the back of your head! Plus...his descriptive passages are so vivid you don't only read about something, you taste it, smell it and dive back into your childhood sometimes to retrieve memories you left behind there! I have never been to USA, let alone Maine, New England and The Rockies. But I know more about those places now than I do about Bognor Regis which is a town not so far from me. No-one will EVER write a book about Bognor Regis, though!)
thar
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 2:31:48 PM

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Yes, all the characters exhibit their damage in different ways.


But that is what I like about books like this - they don't just show the attitudes of the characters- those are themselves formed by the attitudes of the author and his times, so it creates a multilayered social commentary.
The interesting point about this book isn't to me, the 'modern' attitude to sexuality, but the portrayal of people damaged and struggling to adjust to change. In that way it seems a bit more like some Russian literature than English.

I remember liking this - I must have read it as a young teen, when I was reading everything I could - I don't remember much of this 'boring' stuff! Whistle
I tried some other books of his and just didn't engage. Boring as ****. (Typically for that age, I had little patience for people with 'social' problems. In contrast, the dilemmas and fears in LC'sL seem valid).
Although I do remember reading a short story "The Virgin and the Gypsy" as being interesting (although rather akin to "The adventures of the Housewife and the Plumber" in places. Whistle

What, Rom, you haven't read "Butlin's - the Murder Years"?
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 2:50:17 PM
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Thar -

"Butlin's - the Murder Years"?Dancing Dancing Dancing
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 11:04:32 PM

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There's definitely something about the name "Bognor Regis" which brings to mind boredom and monotony, somehow.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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