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chorizo Options
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Sunday, December 3, 2017 9:48:34 PM

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Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
Which way is it pronounced?

The way it say in the transcription:

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/chorizo

Quote:
cho·ri·zo  (chə-rē′zō, -sō)
n. pl. cho·ri·zos
A spicy pork sausage seasoned especially with garlic.

or the way it says in the audio:

http://img.tfd.com/hm/mp3/C0327900.mp3

?

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
mactoria
Posted: Sunday, December 3, 2017 11:00:11 PM
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I've never heard it pronounced as the tfd sound bite does; it's always been pronounced as a "ch" or "ch/sh" blend depending on the regional accent. Chorizo is a Spanish sausage often made in and used in Mexican dishes, but the word itself is from both Spanish and Portuguese languages (slightly different spelling, but about the same pronunciation). Frankly, as a person from Azorean-Portuguese decent, we don't call it chorizo, we just call it linguica....but that's a different issue. I can't find another dictionary on-line that pronounces chorizo with a "k" sound, but maybe someone else can. It often is given slightly different pronunciations and inflections on the "z" sound, sometimes pronouncing it as a "z," sometimes as an "s" and sometimes as a "ts" blend sound.
thar
Posted: Monday, December 4, 2017 1:50:59 AM

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I don't know where tfd got either if these - I have never heard it pronounced with such a hard k.

There are variations, of course, in how hard the ch is, - often in English more in the back of the mouth like a German - ach or a Scottish loch. On the theory that those are 'foreign'. Whistle

The bigger difference would be the z - the ones who haven't learnt Spanish and use a z,and the ones who pull out their best Spanish and give it a th.

Brits acquire their Spanish from Spain, and so z is a th sound.

I thought Americans as a generalisation would be more used to Spanish than Brits, but then I heard an American TV show referring to Ibiza as 'Ibeeza', so that really confused me! I think there must be a difference between South American and Spanish z? Maybe because of the settlers in being more rural, as they had the most reason to migrate?
The 'th' speakers stayed home, and the 'z' preferentially left? Whistle
Víctor Lplz
Posted: Monday, December 4, 2017 1:51:24 AM

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Joined: 5/19/2015
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Hello,

https://forvo.com is a website where you can hear how a word (o phrase) is pronounced.

Regards
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Monday, December 4, 2017 2:27:01 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/13/2015
Posts: 1,356
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Location: Dzerzhinskiy, Moskovskaya, Russia
Thank you!

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
FROSTY X RIME
Posted: Friday, January 26, 2018 11:04:22 AM

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I was utterly shocked to hear the pronunciation on the TFD as I never pronounced the word that way before and thought I had been pronouncing a word wrong again because I hadn't checked the pronunciation for a word but I have found another pronunciation for the word on the Cambridge online dictionary.

"Chorizo" on the Cambridge dictionary

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 10:10:56 PM

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I'd say that the problem mainly in Britain is no-one has really heard a Spanish or Portuguese person say it. Also, how many British people know that chorizo is a Spanish/Portuguese word rather than Italian?

I've heard it pronounced both as "koreetso" and "choreezo".

If you guess that it's Italian, the "ch" would be a hard /k/ sound and "z" is a "ts".
/koʊ rï' tsoʊ/.
I believe that Spanish, Portuguese, and the various South American versions all have slightly different sounds for these symbols - many of these sounds don't even exist in English.

However, everyone seems to agree that the "i" should be "ee" (/i:/ or /ï/) - not "ai" (/aɪ/)

This is the actual pronunciation (from the Gran Diccionario de la Lengua Española).

/tsɒ' rï kɒ/

The "ch" is almost like a British "t" with a very slight sibilant attached.
The two "o" sounds are like the "o" in "hot" not like the "O" in "hope".
The "z" is a sound which does not come into the English language at all, but the nearest is the hard "k" (or Scottish/Welsh "ch").
Stress is on the first syllable, not the second.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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