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Look back in anger Options
taurine
Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 10:27:24 AM

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There are people from Africa who know how great John James Osborne was.
Some of them know Arambe company.
I don't know it.
Is out there anyone who is interested in theatre and can explain, what John Osborne did to the history of British Theatre in 1956 with the production of his play Look Back in Anger?
please

https://www.theguardian.com/stage/2015/mar/30/how-look-back-in-anger-john-osborne



J'ai perdu mes amis en Afrique durant la dernière semaine de 2017
Fyfardens
Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 10:45:02 AM
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taurine wrote:
Some of them know Arambe company.


Why did you mention that?


Quote:
Is out there anyone who is interested in theatre and can explain, what John Osborne did to the history of British Theatre in 1956 with the production of his play Look Back in Anger?


That is dealt with in the article you linked us to:


But why did Look Back in Anger make the impact it did? The first, and most obvious point, is that it put so much of 1950s England on stage. Through the eloquent arias – “not ‘tirades’,” insists Osborne – of Jimmy Porter, it tackles sex, class, religion, politics, the press and the sense of a country stifled by an official, establishment culture.

[...]

I suspect Osborne’s real revolution lay in liberating theatrical language. Osborne himself has written of his despair, as a young actor, of trying to learn Somerset Maugham’s dialogue: “Dead, elusively inert, wobbly like some synthetic rubber substance,” was his typically damning phrase. But Osborne’s language is thrillingly alive and calls on a variety of sources, ranging from Bunyanesqe moral rigour (note the emphasis on words like “fire” and “blood”) to the rat-a-tat repetitions of the music-hall and the sexual candour of DH Lawrence. Osborne showed that theatrical prose could achieve its own distinctive poetry and among the beneficiaries were writers as diverse as Harold Pinter, John Arden and Peter Gill. More immediately, the success of Look Back in Anger gave the Royal Court a pivotal status in British culture and encouraged successive generations to turn to playwriting. Some, such as Arnold Wesker and Ann Jellicoe, were Osborne’s contemporaries.


Others, such as David Hare, Christopher Hampton and Howard Brenton, were products of later decades who burned with a theatrical ambition that Osborne himself had kindled. It is easy to sneer at the journalistic concept of the Angry Young Man (a phrase, incidentally, coined by a dismissive Royal Court press officer). But what is unarguable is that Look Back in Anger, through its blazing immediacy, corrosive vitality and linguistic exuberance, changed British theatre. In the words of Alan Sillitoe, “John Osborne didn’t contribute to British theatre: he set off a landmine called Look Back in Anger and blew most of it up. The bits have settled back into place, of course, but it can never be the same again.”

I speak British English (standard southern, slightly dated).
taurine
Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 10:49:39 AM

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I did mention because of: Adigun -v- McEvoy & Anor, High Court Record Number: 2009 10805 P

J'ai perdu mes amis en Afrique durant la dernière semaine de 2017
Fyfardens
Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 11:27:13 AM
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I am none the wiser. What has that to do with Look Back in Anger?

I speak British English (standard southern, slightly dated).
taurine
Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 11:41:44 AM

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Location: South Dublin, Ireland
John Osborne and his Look back in Anger was used to compare with another theatrical play.
The comparison made served the purpose to make an environment suitable to accuse of racism. (unfairly)

s.57. 1) in http://www.courts.ie/Judgments.nsf/0/E9096B8E405B8EED802581010035BE18

J'ai perdu mes amis en Afrique durant la dernière semaine de 2017
Parpar1836
Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 12:07:51 PM
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Osborne's Jimmy Porter was a new kind of hero. Many popular British plays focused on topics such as aristocracy. Porter is a working-class man who has gained access to higher education, a rarity in those days among people of his social class. In that sense, he is the harbinger of other heroes and antiheroes with no aristocratic pretensions. He is discontented with his poverty, his struggles, his ambitions, his personal relationships, everything. Look Back in Anger was a ground-breaking play about the postwar British social order. Whether it would be considered dated today, as most of Isbsen's plys are, is a qiestion I can't answer. But in postwar Britain, it created quite a splash.
taurine
Posted: Monday, January 15, 2018 12:10:49 PM

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Location: South Dublin, Ireland
Thank you, Parpar1836.
This is what I was looking for.
Thank you, again.

J'ai perdu mes amis en Afrique durant la dernière semaine de 2017
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 2:59:13 PM
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Osbourne was one of the "Angry Young Men" of his era. Post WW2 the world was in a mess, the old order had changed, everyone was broke...and the young playwrights of the time started writing "kitchen-sink" dramas i.e. plays about working class people. It was an entirely new genre as Parpar explained.

When studying Drama post-WW2 theatre is studied separately as it marks the change to "Modern" theatre and all the wonderful innovations that have developed.
taurine
Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 3:04:33 PM

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Location: South Dublin, Ireland
Wow.
Thank you, Romany.

J'ai perdu mes amis en Afrique durant la dernière semaine de 2017
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