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The Moon is an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth (Relative clause Or Noun clause) Options
A cooperator
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 10:21:53 PM

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Hi!


A cooperator wrote:
Drag0nspeaker wrote:


Finally
"An astronomical body" is a noun-phrase.
It is part of the longer noun-phrase "an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth", which is the subject complement in the sentence:
"The Moon is an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth."
Subject - copula - subject complement



You don't think "an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth" is a defining relative clause instead of 'a longer noun phrase'
"an astronomical body" is modified by the relative clause "that orbits planet Earth." Where the relative pronoun 'that' as acting the subject of relative clause, and refers to "the subject complement".

If it was a noun-phrase, then "an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth" has subject and a verb. However, as far as I know that phrase don't have no verb, nor subject at all.

Also, if it was a noun clause, then there mustn't be a noun before the conjunction "that" since in noun clause there is no a pronoun, but a conjunction.
I really think of the part underlined as relative clause 'The Moon is an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth.
If not, and it was a noun clause, then it must be as the underlined part(a noun clause) in in the sentence below:


The idea [[that] [even babies judge appearance]] makes perfect sense to many researchers.
I am a little bit confused here:
You will see that "The idea makes perfect sense to many researchers." is a sentence. The clause (not phrase) [even babies judge appearance] is quite separate; it could even be omitted. It is introduced by the conjunction "that" and further describes "The idea".


I therefore say that [even babies judge appearance] is an adjectival clause modifying "The idea" and it is introduced by the conjunction, that.

If that were a relative pronoun, then we would be able to replace it with "which":

The idea which even babies judge appearance makes perfect sense to many researchers. (incorrect)

The gun, which/that he had found in the room, was loaded. ('Which/that' is a relative pronoun).


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
palapaguy
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 11:43:19 PM

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This eliminates any doubt I might have had.
Fyfardens
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 4:18:29 AM
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A cooperator wrote:
You don't think "an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth" is a defining relative clause instead of 'a longer noun phrase'.


You are right. I don't.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 5:48:39 AM

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A cooperator wrote:
You don't think "an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth" is a defining relative clause instead of 'a longer noun phrase'.

No - it is not introduced by a relative pronoun or relative adverb, but by a noun-phrase - "an astronomical body".

relative clause
Relative clauses (also known as adjective or adjectival clauses) are dependent clauses that provide descriptive information about a noun or noun phrase. Relative clauses are introduced by either a relative pronoun or a relative adverb. . .


"That orbits planet Earth" is a relative clause - it is introduced by the relative pronoun "that".



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
A cooperator
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 9:36:26 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
You don't think "an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth" is a defining relative clause instead of 'a longer noun phrase'.

No - it is not introduced by a relative pronoun or relative adverb, but by a noun-phrase - "an astronomical body".

relative clause
Relative clauses (also known as adjective or adjectival clauses) are dependent clauses that provide descriptive information about a noun or noun phrase. Relative clauses are introduced by either a relative pronoun or a relative adverb. . .


"That orbits planet Earth" is a relative clause - it is introduced by the relative pronoun "that".



Thanks a lot,
Drag0nspeaker,
As you mentioned, and AFAIK:
A relative clause is a subordinate/dependent clause that modifies a noun phrase, most commonly a noun. They starting with the relative pronouns who*, that, which, whose, where, when. They are most often used to define or identify the noun that precedes them.

A noun clause is a dependent clause that acts as a noun. Noun clauses begin with words such as how, that, what, whatever, when, where, whether, which, whichever, who, whoever, whom, whomever, and why. Noun clauses can act as subjects, direct objects, indirect objects, predicate nominatives, or objects of a preposition.

Firstlly: you don't think that "an astronomical body" is modified by the relative clause(dependent/subordinate clause) "that orbits planet Earth.", Where the relative pronoun 'that' as acting the subject of relative clause, and refers to the noun phrase "an astronomical body", which is "the subject complement" in the main clause(independent clause) "The Moon is an astronomical body."

Secondly: Learning is a light through which a human excels.
You don't think 'through which a human excels' is a relative clause.

If I am going to be parsing the the above sentence, then I will be doing it as follows:
(learning" subject,....... 'is' a present auxiliary verb,....... 'a light', a complement noun phrase, ....... "through" preposition,.......'which' a relative pronoun acting as the object of the preposition 'through', and refers to 'a light', the subject complement of the main clause "Learning is a light",........"a human" a noun phrase acting the subject of relative clause,....... 'excels' present intransitive verb.)

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Audiendus
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 11:05:22 PM
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A relative clause is an adjectival clause (not a noun clause). It modifies the subject, object or complement like an adjective, and therefore forms part of the subject, object or complement.

Young people can run faster.
People who are young can run faster. [subject underlined]

I do not eat salty food.
I do not eat food which is salty. [object underlined]

A desert is a very dry place.
A desert is a place that is very dry. [subject complement underlined]

I consider her a trustworthy person.
I consider her a person who is trustworthy. [object complement underlined]
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