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Is to/was to Options
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 3:14:47 PM

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Hi,
I don't understand "Is to" and "Was to". Could you please say meaning.
1- The Foreign Minister is to visit China.
2- The youngest child, John, was to die at the age of fourteen.
NKM
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 5:45:04 PM

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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
1- The Foreign Minister is expected to visit China.
2- The youngest child, John, was destined to die at the age of fourteen.
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 6:01:17 PM

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NKM wrote:
1- The Foreign Minister is expected to visit China.
2- The youngest child, John, was destined to die at the age of fourteen.

Thank you very much.
What do the sentences below mean?

1- Oh, to think of his poor wife, standing there helpless
2- But then to be let down like that, oh it's unfair!
pjharvey
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 4:55:30 AM
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Well, it's not easy to guess without more context...
thar
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 4:59:41 AM

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It is an idiomatic usage.
It is an exclamation (edit, got hijacked by my mistyping! Whistle ) - you can see there is no main verb.

The meaning - well, I can't put it better than the sentences do.
What do you think they are expressing?


Sympathy?
Frustration, anger?


These are emotions expressed through the use of the idiom.
Tara2
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 5:56:18 AM

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Joined: 11/8/2017
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thar wrote:
It is an idiomatic usage.
It is an exclamation (edit, got hijacked by my mistyping! Whistle ) - you can see there is no main verb.

The meaning - well, I can't put it better than the sentences do.
What do you think they are expressing?


Sympathy?
Frustration, anger?


These are emotions expressed through the use of the idiom.


Yes."You use to before the base form of a verb in exclamations when you are emphasizing a very strong emotion, such as a desire or wish, or a regret or disappointment" . This definition is from Collins Dictionary. But I don't understand the sentences.
thar
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 6:23:42 AM

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That would be the context!

Here, poor = pathetic, I feel sorry for her.

So, the wife, who I feel sorry for, is just standing there, helpless.

She could be unable to help her husband as he is being arrested, or beaten up.
Or she could be unable to help herself or her children as her husband does something bad to them.
It will depend entirely on the context. I can't tell you what it means.

But what emotion is it expressing for the wife?


And
Someone has been let down, betrayed. It could be anything, from marital infidelity to government policy.
It is unfair.

What emotions are probably being felt by the speaker?
Tara2
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 6:27:26 AM

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Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 385
Neurons: 1,772
thar wrote:
That would be the context!

Here, poor = pathetic, I feel sorry for her.

So, the wife, who I feel sorry for, is just standing there, helpless.

She could be unable to help her husband as he is being arrested, or beaten up.
Or she could be unable to help herself or her children as her husband does something bad to them.
It will depend entirely on the context. I can't tell you what it means.

But what emotion is it expressing for the wife?


And
Someone has been let down, betrayed. It could be anything, from marital infidelity to government policy.
It is unfair.

What emotions are probably being felt by the speaker?


Thank you so much. I understand.
But How do you find something bad happened for the husband?
FounDit
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 10:43:17 AM

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Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,543
Neurons: 50,661
Tara2 wrote:
thar wrote:
That would be the context!

Here, poor = pathetic, I feel sorry for her.

So, the wife, who I feel sorry for, is just standing there, helpless.

She could be unable to help her husband as he is being arrested, or beaten up.
Or she could be unable to help herself or her children as her husband does something bad to them.
It will depend entirely on the context. I can't tell you what it means.

But what emotion is it expressing for the wife?


And
Someone has been let down, betrayed. It could be anything, from marital infidelity to government policy.
It is unfair.

What emotions are probably being felt by the speaker?


Thank you so much. I understand.
But How do you find something bad happened for the husband?


It is in the sentence you used:
"1- Oh, to think of his poor wife, standing there helpless"
You said "his poor wife". That indicates the bad situation involves her husband. But the focus is on the wife, standing, helpless.

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Tara2
Posted: Friday, January 12, 2018 12:40:48 PM

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Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 385
Neurons: 1,772
Thank you very much FounDit, thar.
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