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could have caught Options
prince
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 10:33:07 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2010
Posts: 472
Neurons: 2,958
"I see no way in which any other team could catch the blinders SA slips pulled off diving forward in the second innings."

"I think there's no any any other team could have caught those slip catches that SA fielders have pulled off diving forward in the second innings."


Kindly correct me the mistakes in both the above sentences and also suggest me which is most effective.


Thank you

Prince
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 11:25:28 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,506
Neurons: 153,691
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi Prince.

Because I know your "hobbies" and location, it is easy to understand these sentences - but "SA" is not a common abbreviation in Britain and I would not immediately guess it.
Also "slips" has other, more likely meanings in the icy and snowy winter of Britain! (Have you ever played cricket on ice?

"Blinders" is also an 'odd' word to me. I knew it (when I was young) in the phrase "he played a blinder" - he played a great game.

"Diving forward" feels awkward, but the wording seems OK - it is just that I can't find the best place in the sentence for it.

However, grammatically, the first sentence seems OK.
I would use the perfect "could have caught", but I don't think the simple present "could catch" is wrong.

To make it a little clearer in local terms here, I'd write it:
"I see no way any other team could have made the brilliant catches that the SA slips pulled off in the second innings by diving forward."

**************
The second one contains a typo which makes it sound odd. Both 'any's are unnecessary

I definitely would NOT use the perfect in the second section - definitely "pulled off" not "have pulled off".

"I think there's no other team could have caught those slip catches that SA fielders pulled off diving forward in the second innings."


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
prince
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 1:09:19 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2010
Posts: 472
Neurons: 2,958
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi Prince.

Because I know your "hobbies" and location, it is easy to understand these sentences - but "SA" is not a common abbreviation in Britain and I would not immediately guess it.
Also "slips" has other, more likely meanings in the icy and snowy winter of Britain! (Have you ever played cricket on ice?

"Blinders" is also an 'odd' word to me. I knew it (when I was young) in the phrase "he played a blinder" - he played a great game.

"Diving forward" feels awkward, but the wording seems OK - it is just that I can't find the best place in the sentence for it.

However, grammatically, the first sentence seems OK.
I would use the perfect "could have caught", but I don't think the simple present "could catch" is wrong.

To make it a little clearer in local terms here, I'd write it:
"I see no way any other team could have made the brilliant catches that the SA slips pulled off in the second innings by diving forward."

**************
The second one contains a typo which makes it sound odd. Both 'any's are unnecessary

I definitely would NOT use the perfect in the second section - definitely "pulled off" not "have pulled off".

"I think there's no other team could have caught those slip catches that SA fielders pulled off diving forward in the second innings."


Thank you very much for the detailed understanding and guessing the correct context to correct me .
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 6:46:19 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 822
Neurons: 5,264
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
I would guess from the context that SA is used as an abbreviation for South Africa who are one of the 10 Test Cricket playing nations.

But it's not a obvious usage that many people would understand.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
NKM
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 10:34:52 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 4,242
Neurons: 199,317
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
I rather enjoyed reading these sentences, for the thrill of being mystified by a seemingly meaningless string of obviously English words in an obviously English sentence!

My only reliable clue was the use of "innings" as a singular noun, which suggested that all the strange terminology must have something to do with cricket. That revelation came as a relief, since it is perfectly normal for me as an American to be totally unacquainted with any aspects of that sport.

Whistle

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 6:18:12 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,506
Neurons: 153,691
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
A translation from English to Amurkain . . .

"I think there's no other team could have caught those slip catches that SA fielders pulled off diving forward in the second innings."

I think there's no other team than South Africa could have pulled off such feats during the third quarter - diving forward and catching the ball so close to the batsman, without the ball having hit the ground.

Slips - the position to one side of the wicketkeeper (catcher), close to the batsman.

A catch - the action of a member of the fielding team catching the ball directly from the bat, without it hitting the ground.

Innings - period in which one team is bowling (pitching) and fielding, while the other team has batsmen on the field.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 6:51:05 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 16,328
Neurons: 65,355
And of course, fingers.

slip catches
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, January 11, 2018 7:20:54 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,506
Neurons: 153,691
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom

Yes, some good examples of 'diving forward' catches there - also some fingers . . .

I think it's the fifth clip there (maybe India/Pakistan) - he caught the ball, but I think a couple of fingers were broken by the way he was holding his hand.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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