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Caesar Crosses the Rubicon (49 BCE) Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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Caesar Crosses the Rubicon (49 BCE)

When it appeared that the Roman Senate would replace him as governor of the province of Cisalpine Gaul, the increasingly powerful Julius Caesar set out for Rome with an army. By law, he was allowed to command troops only within his own province, so by crossing the Rubicon River into Italy proper, he committed an act of war. The phrase "crossing the Rubicon" has thus come to refer to passing the point of no return. According to legend, what famous remark did Caesar make about his risky decision? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 2:29:34 AM

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This Day in History
Caesar Crosses the Rubicon (49 BCE)
When it appeared that the Roman Senate would replace him as governor of the province of Cisalpine Gaul, the increasingly powerful Julius Caesar set out for Rome with an army. By law, he was allowed to command troops only within his own province, so by crossing the Rubicon River into Italy proper, he committed an act of war. The phrase "crossing the Rubicon" has thus come to refer to passing the point of no return.
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 7:03:37 AM

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Alea jacta est. A tragic day for the Roman republic.
Emel Rapchan
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 8:01:28 AM

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This Day in History
Caesar Crosses the Rubicon (49 BCE)
When it appeared that the Roman Senate would replace him as governor of the province of Cisalpine Gaul, the increasingly powerful Julius Caesar set out for Rome with an army. By law, he was allowed to command troops only within his own province, so by crossing the Rubicon River into Italy proper, he committed an act of war. The phrase "crossing the Rubicon" has thus come to refer to passing the point of no return.
Emel Rapchan
Posted: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 9:41:36 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/26/2017
Posts: 594
Neurons: 302,303
Location: Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Not to mention that this event coined a very useful and meaningful expression.
Point of no return

The point of no return (PNR or PONR) is the point beyond which one must continue on one's current course of action because turning back is physically impossible, prohibitively expensive, or dangerous. A particular irreversible action (e.g., setting off an explosion or signing a contract) can be a point of no return, but the point of no return can also be a calculated point during a continuous action (such as in aviation).

Some other related expressions are:
- Burn one's bridges
- Burn one's boats.
- "Break the kettles and sink the boats - This is an ancient Chinese saying, which refers to Xiang Yu's order at the Battle of Julu (207 BC);
- "Fighting a battle with one's back facing a river"
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