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So, what do people think about Al Franken? Options
Andrew Schultz
Posted: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 2:59:24 PM

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Al Franken resigned his Senate seat today. Multiple credible reports of inappropriate touching over the years were his downfall. I still admit I don't know what to think of this: being inappropriately touched is, at the very least, very uncool for me, and I'm male and usually bigger than the people who've tried it. And I don't think "Other people did worse!" is an adequate defense.

Lawrence O'Donnell says "politics isn't fair in that it isn't consistent:" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xb9HH5cwRy8

Part of me is not surprised someone on the Democratic side got caught up in it, and it's the price to pay for moving forward on this issue.

But given that politics is about image, politicians at the very least should have greatly increased standards of behavior.

I'm disappointed to see Franken go. He asked the tough questions that needed to be asked, of Jeff Sessions and Betsy DeVos and others, and he proved to be so much more than a clever comedian. I've enjoyed his books, though I haven't gotten around to Giant of the Senate yet. His "People Like Me" Stuart Smalley book is very funny, and his more political books--well, I won't name them. You can find them on Amazon, and if you agree with me politically, I think you'll like them. Even his "Why Not Me" about a fictitious Presidential run in 2000 has aged well.

But a part of me still feels ripped off, even though the evidence of his behavior is clear, and despite this huge character flaw, I still respect the side of him that was able to ask tough questions with humor. I'm glad he stepped down with public grace. I've heard people complain that those calling on him to resign were opportunists, and of course we can always engage in whataboutism. I won't name names.

I've been outraged a lot in the past year. But this is one of the genuine bummers where I just shake my head and say what a shame it is he had to do that. It's wrong, but it also reminds me of things I've done and said in the past that I'm definitely not proud of, but they happened, and I hope I get better. I guess I don't merit the scrutiny a public figure would, but still, I cringe a bit when someone's sins are exposed, even someone I don't like.

100th person on TFD to 1 million neurons.
Gary98
Posted: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 4:09:19 PM

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He has the decency to resign. And that itself says he is much better than many other shameless politicians.
progpen
Posted: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 6:30:12 PM

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I don't see the sexual harassment as being about a particular political party or political leaning. Sexual harassment is about power. If any position (political or otherwise) puts a person in a position of undue power over others, this will happen. There have been plenty of Democratic politicians at different government levels (local, state, federal) that have denied, lied and attacked when confronted about sexual harassment. I think Franken is the exception, not the rule.

I'm also not happy that Franken is going, but probably for a different reason. I was hoping that Franken going through the whole process of Senate hearings and investigation would shake loose some skeletons in other Senate closets.

Nolite te bastardes carborundorum
Hope123
Posted: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 9:32:12 PM

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As Progpen says, it is about power and right and wrong, not left and right. It does not matter to me what party he belongs to but whether or not he is guilty.

He should have waited for the investigation. There is no excuse for what he did as a comedian IF he is guilty, but if he is guilty of groping, he cleaned up his act once becoming a senator. This raises the questions about apologies, changing one's actions, and second chances. What he was accused of was not even close to what some others are accused of doing - rape, pedophilia, and repression of accusations etc. He resigned but did not admit to sexual misconduct.

"Some of the allegations against me simply are not true. Others I remember very differently,” he said. “I know in my heart that nothing I have done as a senator — nothing — has brought dishonor on this institution. And I am confident that the Ethics Committee would agree.”



Edited - I'll probably be attacked for this, but as a woman I do have an issue with the "we have to believe every woman" phenomenon I'm seeing now. I have seen male teachers lose their reputations, their marriages and kids before the truth came out that the female accuser was lying for one reason or another. So if the accused admit it fine, but if not, I wish that all of the accusations could be investigated before we jump to condemnation of any of the men accused lately. Social media jumps to a lot of wrong conclusions these days.

However, it is hard to verify what happened in private he said, she said happenstances. But still - innocent until proven guilty is the way we do things in our British system.



It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.
almo 1
Posted: Wednesday, January 3, 2018 11:33:52 PM
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Joined: 10/16/2016
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Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan




Just for purpose of reference:


amazon.com/Lies: And the Lying Liars Who Tell Them: A Fair and Balanced/








A NOTE FROM THE AUTHOR




Although I wrote this book in a spirit of dispassionate inquiry,
I cannot expect my critics to respond in kind. My right-wing detractors will undoubtedly tell you that I'm an "obnoxious
prick—a "smug asshole," and a "clear and present threat to our national security
."

I will not stoop to dignify such calumny with a response,
except to say that Condoleezza Rice should watch her mouth.

More imaginative critics might charge that, "like Newt Gingrich, [I] had an affair with a Supreme Court justice."
This kind of attack, which is totally irrelevant to the political
content of this book, exposes how desperate my enemies have become.

Unlike Senator McCarthy and his intellectual heirs, Ann Coulter and Howard Stern, I
do have a sense of decency. And that is why I've decided to reveal a "dirty little secret" about
this book that my critics are too lazy and stupid to figure out on their own. I acknowledge—
no, I proudly acknowledge—that I did not write this book alone.

No author ever writes a book entirely by himself. That would be impossible. Just ask
Dennis Rodman or John Updike. Like making a movie or building a long suspension bridge,
writing a book is very much a team effort. And that is why I think it's important to state
clearly, right up front, the methodology used to research this book, and to give credit to the
ragtag bunch of Harvard misfits I've come to affectionately call TeamFranken.

It all started when Harvard's Kennedy School of Government asked me to serve as a
fellow at its Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics, and Public Policy. After my varied and
celebrated career in television, movies, publishing, and the lucrative world of corporate
speaking, being a fellow at Harvard seemed, frankly, like a step down.
I couldn't think of anything less appealing than molding the minds of tomorrow's
leaders, unless it was spending fireside evenings sipping sherry with great minds at the Faculty
Club. Yawn.

To my surprise and delight, though, all Harvard wanted me to do was show up every
once in a while and write something about something. That gave me an idea.
"Would it be okay if I wrote a scathingly partisan attack on the right-wing media and
the Bush administration?"
"No problem," Harvard said absentmindedly.
"Count me in," I replied. "From now on call me ‘Professor Franken.’”
"No," Harvard said, "you're not a professor. But you can run a study group on the
topic of your choosing."
"Great," I said. "I've got the perfect topic: Write My Son's Harvard College Application
Essay."
"No," they said. "Harvard students already know how to write successful Harvard applications,
Al. We want you to teach them something new."
Harvard was right where I wanted it. "How about if the topic is: How to Research My
Book?"
"Sure," Harvard said. "Most of our professors teach that course. Why, in the Biochemistry
department, most of the graduate level courses are-"
Harvard was boring me. "I gotta run, Harvard. Thanks."

From among the seven hundred students who applied for my study group, I chose
fourteen intellectual heavyweights. Some undergraduates, some from the prestigious Kennedy
School of Government, and one from the Harvard School of Dentistry, just in case. This
was TeamFranken. Like the X-Men, each had his own special power. And each had a story.
There was Bridger McGaw, a Gore campaign veteran still sore from getting burned in
Florida. Madhu Chugh, with a mind as insatiable as her name is unpronounceable. Emmy
Berning, an ultra-feminist with a stunning resume-and a figure to match. Ben Kane and Ben
Wikler, "the Bens," TeamFranken's gay gladiators, whose fierce love for each other fueled
their ceaseless advocacy of justice for gays, lesbians, the transgendered, bisexuals, and manon-
dog enthusiasts, such as Pennsylvania senator Rick Santorum. And the rest.

There were fourteen in all. Tough, smart, and deeply committed to coming to my
Cambridge apartment once a week to eat a delicious hot meal cooked by my wife, Franni.
I felt like I had fourteen children. My fourteen Harvard research assistants. And like
every good parent, I loved each in a different way. Some I loved like the irrepressibly mischievous
child who doesn't do his homework. Others I loved like the good, deserving child
who does all of his homework, mows the lawn, and ghostwrites the chapters. And still others
I loved "more" than the rest, the way a parent secretly chooses favorites and undermines the
self-confidence of the others.

No, I wasn't a perfect leader. But what counts for me, and I hope for you, the reader, is that
this book brings to a new level the politics of personal destruction that have come to define
our era. Because with fourteen researchers, I could do something that my targets seem incapable
of doing-get my facts straight. Nothing highlighted the need for painstaking research
and factchecking more than the hiring process itself, which I had conducted on the basis of
hearsay and guesswork. For example, the "Bens" turned out not to be gay. And one, Owen,
wasn't even named Ben.

Thanks to TeamFranken, you can rest assured that almost every fact in this book is
correct. Either that, or it's a joke. If you think you've found something that rings untrue,
you've probably just missed a hilarious joke, and should blame yourself rather than me
progpen
Posted: Thursday, January 4, 2018 8:39:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/2/2015
Posts: 1,688
Neurons: 246,338
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
Hope123 wrote:
As Progpen says, it is about power and right and wrong, not left and right. It does not matter to me what party he belongs to but whether or not he is guilty.

He should have waited for the investigation. There is no excuse for what he did as a comedian IF he is guilty, but if he is guilty of groping, he cleaned up his act once becoming a senator. This raises the questions about apologies, changing one's actions, and second chances. What he was accused of was not even close to what some others are accused of doing - rape, pedophilia, and repression of accusations etc. He resigned but did not admit to sexual misconduct.

"Some of the allegations against me simply are not true. Others I remember very differently,” he said. “I know in my heart that nothing I have done as a senator — nothing — has brought dishonor on this institution. And I am confident that the Ethics Committee would agree.”



Edited - I'll probably be attacked for this, but as a woman I do have an issue with the "we have to believe every woman" phenomenon I'm seeing now. I have seen male teachers lose their reputations, their marriages and kids before the truth came out that the female accuser was lying for one reason or another. So if the accused admit it fine, but if not, I wish that all of the accusations could be investigated before we jump to condemnation of any of the men accused lately. Social media jumps to a lot of wrong conclusions these days.

However, it is hard to verify what happened in private he said, she said happenstances. But still - innocent until proven guilty is the way we do things in our British system.


Hope, you are correct. There are certain charges that can be made against a person that will immediately destroy that person's life and there is rarely a need to prove those charges for the punishment to be dished out. That is Mob Justice and it exists everywhere and has been around as long as there have been tribes.

Nolite te bastardes carborundorum
philips daughter
Posted: Thursday, January 4, 2018 10:17:56 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/21/2017
Posts: 162
Neurons: 43,153
If there are pictures and he did resign then yes, he did it. Democratic men aren't any different. Most men aren’t political at all. This is culture. Will there be change? Hopefully.
progpen
Posted: Thursday, January 4, 2018 3:36:59 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/2/2015
Posts: 1,688
Neurons: 246,338
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
philips daughter wrote:
If there are pictures and he did resign then yes, he did it. Democratic men aren't any different. Most men aren’t political at all. This is culture. Will there be change? Hopefully.


I feel that the problem here is that he did some of the things he was accused of when he was an entertainer, but probably did not do the more recent things. He did not resign because he was guilty but because the accusations were hurting the Democratic party.

Ultimately the same result but for very different reasons.

Nolite te bastardes carborundorum
almo 1
Posted: Friday, January 5, 2018 9:17:15 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2016
Posts: 1,253
Neurons: 5,715
Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan



Alex DeLarge Forced To Step Down As Leader Of Droogs Amidst Allegations Of Sexual Misconduct






LONDON—Pushed out of power as the damning charges mounted, Alex DeLarge was forced to step down Wednesday as leader of the Droogs amidst allegations of sexual misconduct. “In an unfortunate development, we have been forced to remove Mr. DeLarge from his post due to the startling accusations of sexual impropriety that have come to light,” said Droog member Georgie, explaining that although the group had systems in place to swiftly address such allegations, it clearly did not adequately follow those procedures. “Even though these acts took place decades ago, it does not excuse Alex’s heinous and unforgivable actions. This is not at all what the Droogs stand for.” At press time, DeLarge had offered to undergo two weeks of rigorous aversion therapy to rehabilitate himself.











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