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Daemon
Posted: Friday, December 29, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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hobgoblin

(noun) An object or a source of fear, dread, or harassment.

Synonyms: bugbear

Usage: But this encompassment of her own characterization ... was a sorry and mistaken creation of Tess's fancy—a cloud of moral hobgoblins by which she was terrified without reason.
capitán
Posted: Friday, December 29, 2017 2:58:21 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/18/2013
Posts: 485
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Location: San Salvador, San Salvador, El Salvador
Daemon wrote:
hobgoblin

(noun) An object or a source of fear, dread, or harassment.

Synonyms: bugbear

Usage: But this encompassment of her own characterization ... was a sorry and mistaken creation of Tess's fancy—a cloud of moral hobgoblins by which she was terrified without reason.


_Talking about Tolkien's Legendarium...

_Well, basically, Tolkien uses the word 'goblin' in The Hobbit,
whereas the word 'orc' applies for the sequel (The Lord of The Rings).
They appear to be the same, however, at times, a distinction is being made between the two.

_There is a note that professor Tolkien wrote, and appears in some editions of the Hobbit:

_Orc is not an English word. It occurs in one or two places but is usually translated goblin (or hobgoblin for the larger kinds).
Orc is the hobbits' form of the name given at that time to these creatures, and it is not connected at all with orc, ork, applied to sea-animals of dolphin-kind.


_There is also the word 'gong' which, according to some people, refers to a sub-race of the species.
Others claim that a gong is a creature somehow related to the orcs, but not necessarily of the same species.

_Furthtermore, there are the uruk-hai, which are yet another kind of orc.
'Uruk' means orc in Quenya (one of Tolkien's invented languages),
'Hai' means folk, thus: Orc-folk.

The Uruk-hai were bred by Sauron, the second Dark Lord,
but Saruman the white bred his own kind which could endure the sunlight.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, December 29, 2017 7:53:15 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 1,140
Neurons: 7,322
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
capitán wrote:
Daemon wrote:
hobgoblin

(noun) An object or a source of fear, dread, or harassment.

Synonyms: bugbear

Usage: But this encompassment of her own characterization ... was a sorry and mistaken creation of Tess's fancy—a cloud of moral hobgoblins by which she was terrified without reason.


_Talking about Tolkien's Legendarium...

_Well, basically, Tolkien uses the word 'goblin' in The Hobbit,
whereas the word 'orc' applies for the sequel (The Lord of The Rings).
They appear to be the same, however, at times, a distinction is being made between the two.

_There is a note that professor Tolkien wrote, and appears in some editions of the Hobbit:

_Orc is not an English word. It occurs in one or two places but is usually translated goblin (or hobgoblin for the larger kinds).
Orc is the hobbits' form of the name given at that time to these creatures, and it is not connected at all with orc, ork, applied to sea-animals of dolphin-kind.


_There is also the word 'gong' which, according to some people, refers to a sub-race of the species.
Others claim that a gong is a creature somehow related to the orcs, but not necessarily of the same species.

_Furthtermore, there are the uruk-hai, which are yet another kind of orc.
'Uruk' means orc in Quenya (one of Tolkien's invented languages),
'Hai' means folk, thus: Orc-folk.

The Uruk-hai were bred by Sauron, the second Dark Lord,
but Saruman the white bred his own kind which could endure the sunlight.


In British myths hobgoblins, goblins and hobs are far older than Tolkien.
William Shakespeare has this in A Midsummers Nights Dream"

Act 2 Scene 1
Quote:
Either I mistake your shape and making quite,
Or else you are that shrewd and knavish sprite
Call'd Robin Goodfellow: are not you he
That frights the maidens of the villagery;
Skim milk, and sometimes labour in the quern
And bootless make the breathless housewife churn;
And sometime make the drink to bear no barm;
Mislead night-wanderers, laughing at their harm?
Those that Hobgoblin call you and sweet Puck,
You do their work, and they shall have good luck:
Are not you he?


Hobs were sometimes mischief makers and sometimes helpful around the home or farm.
They are far older legends than this reference too, going back into the mists of time.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Irma Crespo
Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 7:35:55 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/24/2014
Posts: 1,462
Neurons: 105,336
Location: Panamá, Panama, Panama
Noun 1. hobgoblin - (folklore) a small grotesque supernatural creature that makes trouble for human beings hobgoblin - (folklore) a small grotesque supernatural creature that makes trouble for human beings
goblin, hob
folklore - the unwritten lore (stories and proverbs and riddles and songs) of a culture
evil spirit - a spirit tending to cause harm
2. hobgoblin - an object of dread or apprehension; "Germany was always a bugbear for France"; "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds"--Ralph Waldo Emerson
bugbear
object - the focus of cognitions or feelings; "objects of thought"; "the object of my affection"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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