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Denture Options
D00M
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 10:13:01 AM

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Joined: 3/24/2017
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Hello respected teachers,
He doesn't have any teeth; he wears denture.

Is the above correct?

I am looking forward to your answers.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 10:49:55 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Well, presumably, if he has NO teeth he wears dentures (plural) - for both the top and the bottom teeth. "A" denture is only for one or the other - top OR bottom.
D00M
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 12:13:51 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
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Thank you very much.

I am looking forward to your answers.
D00M
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 1:15:36 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
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Sorry, one more question:

He wears a denture for his upper/top teeth.

Is the above fine?

I am looking forward to your answers.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 2:26:04 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
From TFD...

1. A partial or complete set of artificial teeth for either the upper or lower jaw. Also called dental plate.
2. often dentures A complete set of removable artificial teeth for both jaws.

The expression is always "he wears dentures". It is commonly not necessary to be so specific as to need to convey upper-only or lower-only. If that were the case, one would most likely use more than one sentence to explain that.

There is a common assumption here, that somehow, a single sentence is going to provide all the information a person wishes to provide. Not the case.
NKM
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 5:55:06 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

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Location: Corinth, New York, United States
I wear an upper denture, but it would more likely be called (informally) an "upper plate".

Technically, it's not actually a "plate", because it doesn't cover my palate. Thus it's a "partial".

My dentist insists on calling it an "appliance", presumably because it's removable. (My cousin used to have a partial upper denture which was permanently attached by "bridgework" to his remaining upper teeth.)

All of this just to say that we wouldn't really say "a denture for his upper teeth."

srirr
Posted: Friday, December 08, 2017 12:48:14 AM

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Joined: 12/29/2009
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Location: Delhi, NCT, India
What do we say if someone has only two or three false teeth clipped together? Is there a single term for such thing? Can we still call it a denture (or a partial denture)?



We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, December 08, 2017 12:55:22 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I think that, technically, one would call it a partial denture.

However, unless one were the dentist, one would not normally be so specific.
In Britain (as Wilmar says for America) the normal comment would be "He wears dentures."

Generally one would more probably say "He has false teeth."


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Friday, December 08, 2017 1:27:03 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
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I agree, to me it would always be plural - if I ever said it.

Even though a denture does mean 'a set of teeth', I think most people would say dentures, because it is the more technical term for false teeth - plural.
Maybe people who have them, and think of them as a single complete object, might have a different perspective and call it a denture - but it doesn't seem that way, from the responses. They are dentures (plural) because they are your teeth (plural).
One tooth replacement would be singular - a false tooth.
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