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Daemon
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Netsuke

Netsuke are tiny carved figurines used to secure the cord of a purse or container to the sash of a kimono. Carved by Japanese artists from materials such as ivory and wood, netsuke reflect many aspects of Japan's culture, with some representing simple objects and others depicting entire scenes from history and folklore. First invented in the 17th century, the practical yet artistic items are still produced today. Why did the Japanese need to attach containers to their robes in the first place? More...
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 5:08:19 AM

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root and to attach

with my pleasure
KSPavan
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 5:38:58 AM

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Article of the Day
Netsuke
Netsuke are tiny carved figurines used to secure the cord of a purse or container to the sash of a kimono. Carved by Japanese artists from materials such as ivory and wood, netsuke reflect many aspects of Japan's culture, with some representing simple objects and others depicting entire scenes from history and folklore. First invented in the 17th century, the practical yet artistic items are still produced today.
monamagda
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 4:15:28 PM

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The Netsuke Survived




The odyssey of 264 netsuke — Japanese carvings not much larger than cherry tomatoes — lies at the heart of Edmund de Waal’s extraordinary book “The Hare with Amber Eyes.” The carvings in ivory or boxwood with subjects as various as a persimmon or a copulating couple were acquired by Charles Ephrussi in Paris in the 1870s. Ephrussi, a forebear of de Waal with a discerning passion for art, was a very rich man.


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/04/opinion/sunday/cohen-the-netsuke-survived.html
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