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Despite the negative responses received Options
Nikitus
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 10:48:58 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/17/2013
Posts: 277
Neurons: 1,311
Location: Viña del Mar, Valparaiso, Chile
Hello.

First of all, thanks for all your help and time.

I want to ask about the following:



Despite the negative responses received, some showing the concern for her patient, others the pressure for a public hospital system that was collapsing and finally some showing genuine disinterest in helping him, Tim made the decision to go again directly to the man who attended at the front desk of the hospital.



Is it correct to use "Despite the negative responses received, some showing the concern for her patient"

Is it correct to use "others the pressure for a public hospital system that was collapsing and finally some showing genuine disinterest in helping him"

Is it correct to use "Tim made the decision to go again directly to the man who attended at the front desk of the hospital."



Thanks.



FounDit
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 11:42:35 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 8,306
Neurons: 44,413
Nikitus wrote:
Hello.

First of all, thanks for all your help and time.

I want to ask about the following:



Despite the negative responses received, some showing the concern for her patient, others the pressure for a public hospital system that was collapsing and finally some showing genuine disinterest in helping him, Tim made the decision to go again directly to the man who attended at the front desk of the hospital.



Is it correct to use "Despite the negative responses received, some showing the concern for her patient"
We would normally leave out "the" in a sentence such as this one.

Is it correct to use "others the pressure for a public hospital system that was collapsing and finally some showing genuine disinterest in helping him"
Same here. It isn't that it is wrong, exactly, but just we way we speak. The idea is "some showing concern, others (showing) pressure..."

Is it correct to use "Tim made the decision to go again directly to the man who attended at the front desk of the hospital."

You could say this, but a native might shorten it a bit by saying, "Tim made the decision to go directly to the attendant at the front desk".

Thanks.





A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Parpar1836
Posted: Thursday, December 07, 2017 1:46:22 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/30/2014
Posts: 133
Neurons: 8,191
Location: Rochester, New York, United States
Despite the negative responses he received, some showing the concern for the patient, others the pressure from a tottering public-hospital system, and finally some showing genuine indifference to his plight, Tim decided to go directly back to the front-lobby receptionist, the severe-looking man who presided over the equally severe-looking desk. It reminded Tim of a wall, but he told himself to be brave.
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