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Mistake in The Farlex Grammar Book Options
You know who I am
Posted: Saturday, May 06, 2017 6:35:04 PM

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Joined: 1/13/2017
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Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
Hello, TFD.

I would like to point a mistake out in an article from The Farlex Grammar Book:

Link of the article: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Order-of-Adverbs.htm

Where: "Multiple adverbs of the same category
When we use multiple adverbs of the same category to modify the same verb, we order them based on how specific the information is that they provide. For example:
“On my father’s ranch (place), I often (frequency) helped gather the animals at the end of the day (specific time) when I was younger (non-specific time).”
“I lived at home (more specific place) with my parents (less specific place) to save money (purpose) while I working on my doctorate (time).”"

I think it should be: "while I'm working on my doctorate (time)""


I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, May 08, 2017 10:49:02 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,231
Neurons: 151,056
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Actually, as it is history (I lived at home), it should be "While I was working on my doctorate".

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
TFD
Posted: Monday, May 08, 2017 12:00:37 PM

Rank: Administration

Joined: 3/10/2009
Posts: 809
Thank you for bringing this to our attention.

We have made the correction. The sentence now reads: "I lived at home with my parents to save money while I was working on my doctorate."
You know who I am
Posted: Monday, May 08, 2017 6:46:07 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/13/2017
Posts: 599
Neurons: 4,712
Location: Olinda, Pernambuco, Brazil
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Actually, as it is history (I lived at home), it should be "While I was working on my doctorate".


Yes, thank you Drag0n!



I am the way, and the truth and the life, no one comes to the Father except through Me. - John 14:6
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 10:40:55 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,231
Neurons: 151,056
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Another error - or at least a very misleading statement.

Farlex Grammar wrote:
We can also use shall in place of will to form the future tense, but only when the subject is in the first person (I or we). However, this makes the sentence very formal, and it is more commonly found in British English or in polite invitations.


American Heritage wrote:
. . . Lincoln chose to use it instead of will in the Gettysburg Address: "government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth."

This is third person.

Collins Dictionary wrote:
3. (with any noun or pronoun as subject, esp in conditional clauses or clauses expressing doubt) used as an auxiliary to indicate nonspecific futurity: I don't think I shall ever see her again; he doubts whether he shall be in tomorrow.

One example is in the third person.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Audiendus
Posted: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 11:50:01 PM
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Joined: 8/24/2011
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Location: London, England, United Kingdom
Drag0nspeaker/Collins Dictionary wrote:
he doubts whether he shall be in tomorrow.


This looks incorrect to me. I would always use 'will' to express simple futurity in the third person.

I have no problem with the Lincoln quote, which expresses a resolution rather than mere futurity.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 1:57:57 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,231
Neurons: 151,056
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi Audiendus.

Since I am one of the "modern set" who almost never use 'shall' anyway (even in the first person) for a future prediction, it did not seem any more strange than saying
"I doubt whether I shall be in tomorrow."
However, I accept your judgement.

However, the statement in the grammar "but only when the subject is in the first person (I or we)" is still misleading, as there are many uses for shall in other types of future form (resolution, determination, promise, offer, etc).


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 11:51:09 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,231
Neurons: 151,056
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Not exactly a mistake in the grammar - but in the 'test' which was included today.

The article says " If they are functioning as a whole, then you use singular verb tenses and pronouns; if they are acting individually, then you use plural verb tenses and pronouns. . .
Finally, it is worth noting that in British English, it is more common for collective nouns to function as plurals in all instances."


Then asks:
4. A collective noun is usually _______ in a sentence.
a. Plural
b. Singular
c. Neither
d. A & B


I, of course, answered A & B (answer 'd') - to suit both of those criteria (In Britain, India, Australia, Africa and a lot of Europe - places where British English is used - the answer would be 'a').

This was marked wrong - saying that the correct answer is 'b'.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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