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out from/of -- the passing of motion Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 8:10:34 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
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When my daughter was out from the surgery room, I was stunned. Her intestine was sewn outside of her body, with a plastic bag attached to the intestine to facilitate the passing of motion. I need to change the plastic bag two to three times a day.

1. Is it 'out from' or 'out of'?

2. Where I live, 'the passing of motion' refers to defecation? I wonder if native speakers use the same term.

Thanks.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 9:47:40 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,342
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Koh,

1. It's "came out of...".

2.We do -but in this case it would have to be plural, wouldn't it? The colostomy bag isn't being worn for one single occasion, but to contain all the waste i.e. ALL her motions.

When I say we use the word; perhaps it would have been better to say "We KNOW the usage." because the "average person" wouldn't use the word: there are heaps and heaps of euphemisms for faeces - some people even have "family" words for it - i.e. words only used by the members of their family! Others see nothing wrong with calling a spade a spade: in the UK the common word is "pooh" - even in notices in doctors' surgeries!
Koh Elaine
Posted: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 11:47:18 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 2,778
Neurons: 11,286
Thanks, Romany.

1. I wonder if native speakers use "passing of motion" to mean 'defecation".

For example, we say, "I have not passed motion for the past three days. I need to take some laxative."

2. When my daughter came out of the surgery room... Is surgery room an acceptable term?

Thanks.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 12:03:26 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,342
Neurons: 40,648
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

One coming back to England after so long, I've found that a lot of the words I used to use, have fallen out of use.

A doctor might say to a patient "How long since you've passed a motion?" "How long since you've passed a stool" or "How long since you've had a bowel motion?". But that's usually only to older persons - according to my local GP.

It seems that the answer to all 3 of the above questions would be "I haven't poohed in 3 days."

It's a usage that makes me shudder. (Though I've never told an English person that!)
Koh Elaine
Posted: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 12:27:02 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 2,778
Neurons: 11,286
Thanks, Romany.

You've missed the second question, which I have reproduced below for your easy reference.

2. When my daughter came out of the surgery room... Is surgery room an acceptable term? Should it be 'operating theatre' or 'operation theatre' instead?


Romany
Posted: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 12:39:31 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,342
Neurons: 40,648
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom


So sorry, Koh - you're right: didn't see it.

Well, it's a perfectly good thing to say: the room where the surgery was performed.

However, what we would say would be "When she came out of surgery...." "when she came out of the operating theatre..."
Koh Elaine
Posted: Tuesday, December 05, 2017 8:16:02 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 2,778
Neurons: 11,286
Thanks, Romany.
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