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He steps in the water Options
bihunsedap
Posted: Sunday, November 12, 2017 8:30:29 PM

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He watched Godzilla.

He saw the Godzilla went in the water.

"He steps in the water."

Does it sound natural? What is the alternative way to say it go from land to sea?

palapaguy
Posted: Sunday, November 12, 2017 9:21:50 PM

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He stepped/walked/waded/went/wandered/proceeded/sashayed into the water.

(Or maybe all but the last.)

Romany
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 6:46:59 AM
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The simplest way we'd say it is just "He went in the water!" or, as he starts to do it - "He's going in the water!"
palapaguy
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 10:45:35 AM

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Romany wrote:

The simplest way we'd say it is just "He went in the water!" or, as he starts to do it - "He's going in the water!"

"He went into the water" might be preferred.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 1:05:16 PM

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I'm afraid not - He's fallen in the water, he's gone in the water, he stepped in a puddle.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 1:14:51 PM
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Ah curses, Drago! Now I've got a high-pitched little ear-worm telling me gormlessly "He's fallen in the war-ta"
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 1:25:00 PM

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Bluebottle
, the young boy-scout: "I remember! Do you remember, Eccles?"

Eccles: "Yer, I remember Eccles."


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
bihunsedap
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 7:17:07 PM

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Thanks all.
Romany
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 7:22:48 PM
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That still brought an audible laugh when I read your post.

In Pt. Moresby the best place to get the BBC Home Service (or whatever it was called) was at the drive-in. A friend of mine's wife loathed The Goons, so he and I used to go to the Drive-in on Tuesdays, climb into the back of his station-wagon and lie back, backs to the screen, and screeching in helpless fits of laughter. Which must have struck the people round us as odd if the film were a drama or a tear-jerker!

We'd The Goon Show while his wife, also my mate, went off and had a night of Yoga and Spa. And such were the re-runs that I ended up knowing whole scripts off by heart during the 12 years I spent there!

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 2:14:31 AM

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I saw a documentary, years ago, in which the guys were interviewed about their experiences and they were asked about the characters - where the ideas for them had come from.

I don't now remember which way round it was, but I think it was Harry Seacombe who was at home one day when a little boy-scout came to the door asking for a job ("Bob-a-job week").
He was so taken by the boy's voice and accent that he paid him to go to Peter Sellers' house and say "Harry sent me, he says I have to speak to you."
Thus was born Peter Sellers' character 'Bluebottle the little boy-scout'.

That whole period (the fifties and sixties) brought out some genius - several series of radio comedies on the BBC.
My brother and I spent hours each weekend listening to The Goon Show, The Navy Lark, Tony Hancock, Kenneth Horne.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 8:40:58 AM
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Our reception dictated what one heard and didn't hear then - for some reason I don't think I've ever heard The Navy Lark. But Round the Horn used to be on Saturday afternoons - and who was ever at home on a Saturday afternoon, for goodness' sake?

Hancock - and Peter Sellers - were friends of my parents, but Hancock terrified me. He had an enormous gruff laugh which sounded like a roar so I could never tell whether he was cross or not. I chose to believe, I think, that he was *always* cross so I never, ever, listened to "Hhhhhancocks Half Hour" - even though I was a teenager by the time we moved to PNG!!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 9:56:37 AM

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I think we listened on the Light Program (more or less the one which split into Radio One and Radio Two) and Saturday lunch-time and after the six-o'-clock news every other day was our time.

What I remember of Tony Hancock, his laugh was always self-deprecatory.
He was basically miserable (the character he portrayed, that is). Even his enthusiasms were apathetic ones.
His highest future goal and enthusiasm was to give up everything and live as a hermit on Hampstead Heath, eating only nuts & berries.

I just read some of the BBC rules for the period - quite amazing when you think of Julian & Sandy and characters like Hugh Jampton, Molly Coddle and so on.

Quote:
"... There is an absolute ban upon the following: jokes about lavatories, effeminacy in men, immorality of any kind, suggestive references to honeymooning couples, chambermaids, fig leaves, ladies’ underwear (eg. winter draws on), animal habits (eg. rabbits), lodgers, commercial travellers ... "


So - to raise the cultural tone, we will now have a version of the old British sea-shanty "What Shall We do With the Drunken Nurker?" by Rambling Syd Rumpo.
Quote:

What shall we do with the drunken nurker,
What shall we do with the drunken nurker,
What shall we do with the drunken nurker,
He’s bending his cordwangle.

Hit him in the nadgers with the bosun’s plunger,
Slap him on the grummitt with a wrought iron lunger,
Cuff him in the moolies with the Captain’s grungerrrrr....
Till his bodgers dangle.


Classic! No-one could complain about traditional lyrics of that sort.

****************
It's funny (well, odd) that they were all depressed/sad types in real life.
Harry Secombe was probably the most sane of the lot - at least he didn't end up in a psych ward or attempt suicide - but even he was extremely serious when he wasn't 'acting the Sea-goon'.




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, November 14, 2017 1:22:51 PM
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I absolutely loved that! Kinda what I used to do as a kid, too. If anyone teased or had a go at me I would fire off a whole string of words at them that meant absolutely nothing but sounded disgusting!!

As for Secombe - he and Jimmy Edwards were among my favourite "Uncles" - they were both very jolly always when I was around and I suspect now that they just liked children. Whereas Sellers always treated me with a serious kind of dignity that made me feel very grown-up and important. Looking back, the thing about all my parents friends was that none of them treated me like a child - no artificial voices or feigned astonishment or interest. And no pursing of lips and "Pas devant l'enfant" like my real Aunt and Uncle!

You know that both Sellers and Hancock were bi-polar, don't you? (Still referred to as Manic Depression back then) In fact I think when I was diagnosed, my parents and Sellers had a bit of a chat about it. Which is strange, considering Hancock was in Oz then in, I seem to recall, Sydney.(Or perhaps he was already dead by then?) Whereas Sellers was (again, I don't recall clearly)I think in the USA.

Ah, the mysterious world of Grown-ups - and the Almost-grown-ups.

Wish I'd known at the time what sort of bizarre life I was leading!!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 2:36:53 AM

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You're making me jealous - no celebrity uncles when I was a lad . . .
My 'claim to fame' is knowing Neil Gaiman (mainly when he was a teenager - I'm still friends with his mum, though he's in the USA most of the time now).

We definitely pick 'odd' people, don't we?

My opinion (which is shared by most kids, I think) is that it's much more comfortable for everyone if I treat children as 'small people' rather than some strange aliens.

They just haven't learned to 'suppress' themselves, hide their feelings or lie very well yet.





Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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