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Can you use "in" twice? Options
robjen
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 3:36:49 PM
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I am going to make up two pairs of sentences below.

(1a) There is only 15ml of detergent in the bottle in the kitchen.
(1b) There is only 15ml of detergent in the bottle for the kitchen.

(2a) There is a mistake in question 5 in the physics solution manual.
(2b) There is a mistake for question 5 in the physics solution manual.


I am using "in" twice in the a's.

Does that sound odd to native English speakers? If it does, should I change "in" to "for" as shown in the b's?

Please help me. Thanks a lot.
georgieporgie
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 3:51:44 PM
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Both (1a) and (2a) are normal and common.
NKM
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 4:06:34 PM

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There's nothing wrong with using "in" twice in the same sentence. In fact, trying to avoid that repetition would effectively spoil the sentences.

thar
Posted: Saturday, November 11, 2017 4:09:43 PM

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Yes, you use it as many times as you need.

The bottle is in the kitchen and the detergent is in the bottle.

'for' changes the meaning.
If you have just bought two cans of air freshener, and they are still in your shopping bag, you can say where they are supposed to go (what their purpose is). WHere they are destined for.
One is for the bathroom and one is for the kitchen. But once you take them out of the bag and put them in the bathroom or in the kitchen, they are in that room - in the kitchen.

The detergent is in a bottle in a box in a cupboard in the kitchen.

'for' often implies purpose. It doesn't work for contents of a question.

If something exists within or inside something, it is in it.
The mistake is in the question.
The question is in the book.

There is mistake in a sentence in a question in one of the tests in the physics book.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 5:29:27 AM

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You can even have two words like 'in', in a row. . . Anxious

Is there a cupboard to put the detergent in, in the kitchen?

When you speak such a sentence, the individual phrases are separated by changing tone of voice, pauses and so on.
It does not sound so bad at all - though one might try to re-phrase the sentence.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 5:52:46 AM
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Robjen - there seem to have been a number of posts lately about whether one can use the same word twice in a sentence.

There is no grammatical rule which says one can't. It's purely a stylistic matter.

However, even if there were a rule, it would be almost impossible to abide by. The most commonly used words in English are prepositions, pronouns....all the "little" words which are like the nuts and bolts which hold a car together: - they are small but important. We HAVE to use them more than once in many sentences because they are performing different functions and are necessary to our understanding.

The thing about using the same word twice is *mainly* about adjective and adverbs, e.g.

"My parents took us to a lovely restaurant, where we had a lovely meal." There are so many positive adjectives in English, a person appears not to understand this if they can't think of any word other than "lovely", so we advise them to get rid of one.Besides which, it sounds boring to repeat the same one.

But it pertains to nouns as well: "We set out for the beach. When we got to the beach we parked the car. Then we walked from the car to the beach. Once on the beach we laid down our beach-towels for a nap." That sort of thing comes into the "don't use the same word" thing. As you can see, it makes it childish and boring to read.

Whereas Drago's sentence "Is there a cupboard to put the detergent in, in the kitchen?" with two words exactly the same next to each other, could never be called boring!
srirr
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 6:40:39 AM

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Don't go in inn in which there is no food. Anxious



We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 7:25:32 AM

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Or a pub with no beer!



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 7:41:35 AM

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Of dear! I have a fear there's no beer in here.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Romany
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 1:28:28 PM
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Ah Drago,

"Old Billy the blacksmith, first time in his life
Has gone home cold sober, to his darling wife
He walks in the kitchen, she says you're early my dear?
Then he breaks down and tells her, the pubs got no beer."

(My favourite verse)

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 1:39:47 PM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
It's funny - it is so obviously Australian in phrasing and sentiment - but it is stated to be 'traditional Irish' or 'Country & Western'.
I guess it's because the most popular versions were by Slim Dusty and The Dubliners.

Apparently it was true. There was a shortage and the composer rode twenty miles from his farm to the pub, and found that they had no beer - so he went home and wrote the original poem.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 7:04:33 PM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Geez, Drago - fancy knowing about Slim Dusty? The memories that name - and that song - bring crowding back of outback Queensland!

Not that I'm a C & W fan; but hell's teeth - the distances of flat, featureless scrub, or desert where you could drive for an entire day without seeing another vehicle on the road!

And the only music you could pick up for mile after sweaty mile was Slim Dusty and Slim Dusty wannabees on all the very few "local" radio stations you picked up.
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