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Could well be Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 10:21:16 AM
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It could well be the last of his innumerable comebacks but Dinesh Karthik is not losing sleep over it as he intends to build on the recent gains in international cricket by following the timely advice of India coach Ravi Shastri.

https://m.timesofindia.com/sports/cricket/news/ravi-shastris-timely-advice-has-helped-me-dinesh-karthik/articleshow/61627566.cms

What I the grammatical form and function of "could well be"?

Could: modal verb meaning it's possible that

Well: ? , meaning-?

-be - the main verb, an infinitive form of "to be" without "to"
palapaguy
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 10:40:26 AM

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Location: Calabasas, California, United States
"It could well be" means "It is very possible that ..." or "It is likely that ..."
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 10:55:06 AM
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Joined: 11/3/2016
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Neurons: 5,343
Is "well" an adverb here? What does it mean?
palapaguy
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 11:06:54 AM

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Location: Calabasas, California, United States
A search for synonyms for the adverb "well" produced: strong, star, together, flourishing, great, and others.

A search for usage examples produced:
The car was well designed.
She manages people very well.
I can’t sing as well as Jessica (= She sings better).
His point about reducing waste is well taken (= accepted as a fair criticism).
The two hours of discussion was time well spent (= it was a useful discussion).
I want to congratulate you on a job well done.
NKM
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 12:02:52 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

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Yes, "well" is an adverb here.

It's part of a common idiomatic usage. We say "could well be" (or "may well be" or "might well be") to mean that something is entirely possible.

The same kind of construction works with other verbs and tenses, too.

- "Their plot might well have succeeded if the police had arrived too late to stop them."

Jigneshbharati
Posted: Monday, November 13, 2017 12:26:12 PM
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Joined: 11/3/2016
Posts: 991
Neurons: 5,343
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