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D00M
Posted: Tuesday, November 07, 2017 3:27:35 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
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Hello respected teachers,

Do they feel like they are good friends?

Is the above grammatical? Is 'like' a conjunction? What type of clause is the the underlined?

I am looking forward to your answers.
Audiendus
Posted: Friday, November 10, 2017 8:16:18 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
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Location: London, England, United Kingdom
D00M wrote:
Do they feel like they are good friends?

Is the above grammatical? Is 'like' a conjunction? What type of clause is the the underlined?


The sentence is acceptable in informal English. In good written English, we would use "as if" instead of "like".

"Like" is a conjunction. "They are good friends" is a dependent clause.
thar
Posted: Friday, November 10, 2017 8:32:13 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,869
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But be careful you understand what it means. You have good English so I am just being cautious here, checking that you are not confusing the meaning.
This sentence is not about what they feel - friendship.

It is what they consider their relationship to be. Their judgement of it.
They feel like they are good friends - but that feeling might be wrong.
If there is a problem, they may turn on each other, in which case they were wrong, and they were never good friends.
I am just checking the meaning because it is a quite an unusual thing to ask. Normally, you know whether you are good friends with someone or not. It is not normally something you are asked to analyse.
TheParser
Posted: Friday, November 10, 2017 9:47:44 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,674
Neurons: 22,062
NOT A TEACHER


Hello, Doom:

Your question has fascinated me.

Because you used the question form, it has confused me.

I will discuss the affirmative form instead.


*****




1. "We have known each other for one year. So I am going to tell you a secret because I feel (that) we are good friends."


2. "We have just met. But there is something so sincere about you that I feel like/as if we are already good friends."

In formal American English, we would say: "I feel as if we were already good friends." The "were" is the subjunctive.

Only for the sake of analysis, the sentence is: "I feel as [I would feel] if we were already good friends." (But we are NOT already good friends!)
Romany
Posted: Friday, November 10, 2017 11:03:23 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Agee with Thar that it's just a weird thing to say.

As both Thar and Parsar have shown - one could, conceivably, construct a scenario where it might not sound so weird. But that's a very specialised, specific sort of context.

So I'd be very curious to see what context you would put the question into? Because yes, it's very likely that what the sentence means to us, and what it means to you, differ.
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