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Is it OK to repeat 'Joshuah'? Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 11:59:35 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 2,634
Neurons: 10,759
According to Joshuah, from August to December last year, Joshuah went through countless chemotherapy sessions in hospital, something he described as “the darkest time of life”.

“From early this year till now, it [cancer treatment at hospital] has been on and off, including bone marrow transplant I’ve gone through. At earlier stage, I was very weak due to chemotherapy.”

1. Is it OK to repeat 'Joshuah'?
2. Are there any errors in the above text?

Thanks.
rroselavy
Posted: Thursday, November 09, 2017 2:06:26 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 7/21/2016
Posts: 46
Neurons: 10,954
The repetition isn't wrong, but it's awkward and should be avoided. E.g.,

"Joshuah reported that from August to December of last year, he underwent..."

As for errors:

"underwent" is better than "went through," though the latter is not wrong.
"in hospital" is probably BE; AE is "at the hospital."

Missing articles in the rest, at least in AE:
[cancer treatment at hospital] > at the hospital
including bone marrow transplant I’ve gone through > including the bone marrow transplant I had
At earlier stage > At an earier stage, in the early stages.

Also, "due to," strictly speaking, should modify a noun:
I was very weak due to chemotherapy > I suffered weakness due to chemotherapy, Or: Chemotherapy made me very weak; I was very weak after/following/because of chemotherapy.
Koh Elaine
Posted: Thursday, November 09, 2017 1:09:25 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 2,634
Neurons: 10,759
Thanks, rroselavy.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, November 09, 2017 2:09:07 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,122
Neurons: 40,026
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Koh - You're getting a lot of these from things written by local journos and writers, aren't you?

The thing is that I know you want to learn BE which was what was spoken in Singapore when we (Brits) put ourselves in charge. And the language which is appearing now is Singapore English.

But I wanted to be clear that though there are numerous points at which it differs a lot from BE, that doesn't make these young writers "wrong" or uneducated. They're helping to forge yet another English language; "Singaporean English" until recently was modelled on how "British" one sounded, don't forget.

I admit some of them do make a hash of it sometimes - but that's just 'growing pains'. I think we have a privileged seat in which to observe the emergence of a language with more of Asia in it than of far-away Britain!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, November 09, 2017 8:23:38 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 27,115
Neurons: 149,215
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
rroselavy says that 'in hospital' is more British English than American English, which is very true.

In addition, in British English, it has a slightly different meaning than 'at the hospital'.

If Joshua was admitted to the hospital (even just overnight each time he had a chemotherapy session) he might say that he had the sessions "in hospital".

If the sessions were done as an outpatient (not sleeping in the hospital, just visiting) he would say that the sessions were 'in the hospital' or 'at the hospital'.

"In hospital" as a phrase is only used to describe someone who has been admitted to stay in the hospital.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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