The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

semicolon .......... Options
n_jagota
Posted: Thursday, November 09, 2017 2:00:40 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 10/8/2016
Posts: 3
Neurons: 55
Can anyone tell me what the semicolon separating the meanings of a word in a lexicon means ?

For example : following word that comes in a dictionary

- impertinent, adj.

not pertinent or relevant; irrelevant

what do you mean by ; sandwiched between the meanings of a word ?

Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, November 09, 2017 4:25:23 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 39,651
Neurons: 296,660
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
First of all, the definitions of some word are usually not full, indepentend sentences. It would look odd if periods or commas were used.

What follows the semicolon should not be considered as a separate definition, but either a clarification, or just a slightly different connotation of what is before the semicolon.

If it were an entirely different definition, it would be listed under a separate number.


TFD (Collins):

impertinent

adj

1. rude; insolent; impudent
2. irrelevant or inappropriate



In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, November 09, 2017 1:05:16 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,122
Neurons: 40,026
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

It is a convention in English to put semi-colons in to separate different things in a list. This is a list of synonyms. Which means each word in the list means something different; but by reading them you get more understanding of what "impertinent" means.

Thus, being a list, it uses semi-colons.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.