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hokecro
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 8:28:38 AM

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Why does this define sexual aversion vs. a phobia of man?
Romany
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 8:53:52 AM
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Because it's a 'made up' word. The "homo" part doesn't refer back to the classical meaning, but to the slang term "homo" as meaning a homosexual man. (For some strange reason it doesn't refer to homosexual women!)

So, by tacking "phobia" onto the short-form/slang version of "homosexual"(homo), "homophobic" was born in the early 70s or late 60s.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 9:25:21 AM

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Homo is the genus that encompasses the extant species Homo sapiens (modern humans), plus several extinct species classified as ancestral to or closely related to modern humans, most notably Homo erectus. The genus is between 2 and 3 million years old, taken to emerge with the appearance of Homo habilis and possibly that of Homo gautengensis.Homo is derived from the genus Australopithecus, which itself had previously split from the lineage of Pan, the chimpanzees Taxonomically, Homo is the only genus assigned to the subtribe Hominina which, with the subtribes Australopithecina and Panina, comprise the tribe Hominini (see evolutionary tree below). All species of the genus Homo plus those species of the australopithecines that arose after the split from Pan are called hominins.

Homosexuality is romantic attraction, sexual attraction or sexual behavior between members of the same sex or gender. As a sexual orientation, homosexuality is "an enduring pattern of emotional, romantic, and/or sexual attractions" to people of the same sex. It "also refers to a person's sense of identity based on those attractions, related behaviors, and membership in a community of others who share those attractions."

(TFD)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
whatson
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 9:49:09 AM
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*
Let's not mix apples and oranges.
Unfortunately there are two homos.
One is Greek (= same), one Latin (= man).
The prefixes in homonym and heteronym
are the same as in homo/heterosexual,
they weren't created from slang.

More on the subject on sites dealing
with Greek and Latin prefixes.

JJ - Your two paragraphs are from
ONE article on TFD? Simply shocking!

EDIT - On the origin of the words in question:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl-Maria_Kertbeny



If I were a lame 'un, I wouldn't advertise it.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 10:07:50 AM

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The basic answer to the original question is "why does any word mean what it does?".
Romany
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 11:50:30 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Whatson & JJ -

Yes, I am fully aware of the Greek and Latin "homo" and how it has been used differently and causes grumpy Classical scholars to mumble into their beards.

But in this particular usage that, as I explained quite clearly I thought,Classical etymology has nothing to do with this word. Despite your contradiction that in this case it does apply, I think if you do a bit of hunting around on some etymology sites you'll find out why we have answered differently.

This is a very VERY recent usage which did not just gradually evolve, its a deliberately 'made up' word and was indeed composed of a slang/common short-form and "phobia".
NKM
Posted: Monday, October 30, 2017 12:18:03 PM

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It's because of the confusion between the Greek and Latin prefixes that so many people think (erroneously) that the word "homosexual" is not applicable to women.

And let's not confuse "homophobia" with "misanthropy".

palapaguy
Posted: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 12:30:29 AM

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NKM wrote:
It's because of the confusion between the Greek and Latin prefixes that so many people think (erroneously) that the word "homosexual" is not applicable to women.

And let's not confuse "homophobia" with "misanthropy".


Nor with Misandry.
Acd4u
Posted: Saturday, November 04, 2017 4:29:48 AM

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Hi All I am Bobby-Jo
and I'm a cross-dresser & a Homosexual.Applause
Romany
Posted: Saturday, November 04, 2017 7:49:02 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,172
Neurons: 40,153
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Uh - hi. Now you are gay as well as a cross-dresser? Having introduced yourself earlier but not having joined in any of the forums, it's a little confusing - if you aren't a bot or a troll! - to know why you have re-introduced yourself and upped the ante?

Does the fact that you are a cross-dresser or gay influence your knowledge and love of the English Language? If not, just jump right in and join the discussions - where our sex-lives stay private as unimportant in discussions of grammar or vocabulary or literature etc.
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