The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

calve Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 22,016
Neurons: 66,051
Location: Inside Farlex computers
calve

(verb) To set loose (a mass of ice). Used of a glacier or iceberg.

Synonyms: break up

Usage: From the deck of the ship, we saw the magnificent glacier calve, sending massive shards of glassy ice into the waters below.
KSPavan
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 1:25:26 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 1,996
Neurons: 1,973,327
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Word of the Day
calve
Definition: (verb) To set loose (a mass of ice). Used of a glacier or iceberg.
Synonyms: break up
Usage: From the deck of the ship, we saw the magnificent glacier calve, sending massive shards of glassy ice into the waters below.
KSPavan
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 1:25:27 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 1,996
Neurons: 1,973,327
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Word of the Day
calve
Definition: (verb) To set loose (a mass of ice). Used of a glacier or iceberg.
Synonyms: break up
Usage: From the deck of the ship, we saw the magnificent glacier calve, sending massive shards of glassy ice into the waters below.
Potso Molebatsi
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 2:18:57 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 9/26/2017
Posts: 9
Neurons: 26,572
Location: Phuthaditjhaba, Free State, South Africa
calve
Definition: 1- To set loose (a mass of ice). Used of a glacier or iceberg.
2- To give birth to a calf.
Synonyms: break up
Usage: From the deck of the ship, we saw the magnificent glacier calve, sending massive shards of glassy ice into the waters below.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 3:33:43 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/19/2017
Posts: 759
Neurons: 68,526
Location: Baghdad, Mayorality of Baghdad, Iraq

calve
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
calve (kăv, käv)
v. calved, calv·ing, calves
v.intr.
1. To give birth to a calf.
2. To break at an edge, so that a portion separates. Used of a glacier or iceberg.
v.tr.
1. To give birth to (a calf).
2. To set loose (a mass of ice). Used of a glacier or iceberg.
[Middle English calven, from Old English *calfian, from calf, calf.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
calve (kɑːv)
vb
1. (Zoology) to give birth to (a calf)
2. (Geological Science) (of a glacier or iceberg) to release (masses of ice) in breaking up
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
calve (kæv, kɑv)

v. calved, calv•ing. v.i.
1. to give birth to a calf.
2. (of a glacier, an iceberg, etc.) to break up or splinter so as to produce a detached piece.
v.t.
3. to give birth to (a calf).
4. (of a glacier, an iceberg, etc.) to produce (a detached piece) by calving.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English (Anglian) *calfian, derivative of calf calf1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
calve
Past participle: calved
Gerund: calving

with my pleasure
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 3:34:30 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/19/2017
Posts: 759
Neurons: 68,526
Location: Baghdad, Mayorality of Baghdad, Iraq
Explicitly mentioning both nouns
Often, the two nouns that are being compared both appear in the sentence. This is the case if there is any chance of the listener or reader being confused by what you’re talking about. When we need to mention both nouns, we follow this structure:
Noun 1 + be + comparative adjective + than + noun 2
For example:

“An airplane is bigger than a car.”
“Mt. Everest is taller than Mt. Fuji.”
“Tom is faster than John.”

In each of these sentences, the noun that has the characteristic to a greater degree comes first. We can achieve the same meaning by using opposite adjectives and switching the order that the nouns appear in. For example:

“A car is smaller than an airplane.”
“Mt. Fuji is shorter than Mt. Everest.”
“John is slower than Tom.”

If we want to achieve the same effect using “long” adjectives, instead of inserting the word more before the adjective, we can insert the word less. For example:

“Tom is more studious than John.”

OR

“John is less studious than Tom.”

Keep in mind that the two nouns being compared don’t necessarily have to be individual people or objects. One or both of the nouns or noun phrases being compared can also refer to groups. For example:

“Cats are more independent than dogs."
“Women are shorter than men.”
“Jen is smarter than the rest of the students in her class.

We can even compare two gerunds (verbs ending in “-ing” that function as nouns). We can compare characteristics of two gerunds in the same way that we can compare any other type of noun:

“Running is faster than walking.”
“Drawing is easier than painting.”
“Sailing is more relaxing than water-skiing.”

Finally, we can use the regular patterns for making negative and interrogative sentences. For negatives, we simply add the word not, or its contracted form, “-n’t,” after the verb be:

“Walking is not faster than running.”
“Women aren’t taller than men.”
“Waterskiing isn’t more relaxing than sailing.”

To form interrogatives (questions), we simply place the conjugated form of the verb be at the beginning of the sentence:

“Is running faster than walking?”
“Is Jen smarter than the rest of the students in her class?”
“Are cats more independent than dogs?”

with my pleasure
monamagda
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 8:03:19 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 5,722
Neurons: 3,720,331
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia

What happens when glaciers crack up: Stunning simulations reveal the shock waves that cause chunks of ice to calve



The new study from California Institute of Technology examined the effect of the ‘melange’ breakup on iceberg calving – or the process of shedding chunks of ice. Melange is a ‘floating aggregation of sea ice and icebergs’


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4276614/Stunning-simulations-reveal-happens-glaciers-crack-up.html#ixzz4vU1mrkmB



monamagda
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 8:04:12 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 5,722
Neurons: 3,720,331
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia

What happens when glaciers crack up: Stunning simulations reveal the shock waves that cause chunks of ice to calve


The new study from California Institute of Technology examined the effect of the ‘melange’ breakup on iceberg calving – or the process of shedding chunks of ice. Melange is a ‘floating aggregation of sea ice and icebergs’


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4276614/Stunning-simulations-reveal-happens-glaciers-crack-up.html#ixzz4vU1mrkmB


Irma Crespo
Posted: Sunday, October 15, 2017 4:50:58 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/24/2014
Posts: 1,234
Neurons: 75,512
Location: Panamá, Panama, Panama
calve

Definition: (verb) To set loose (a mass of ice). Used of a glacier or iceberg.
Synonyms: break up
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.