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To note an artist's limitations is but to define his talent. A reporter can write equally well about everything that is... Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, October 12, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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To note an artist's limitations is but to define his talent. A reporter can write equally well about everything that is presented to his view, but a creative writer can do his best only with what lies within the range and character of his deepest sympathies.

Willa Cather (1873-1947)
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Thursday, October 12, 2017 8:29:14 AM

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Cather, Willa Sibert
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Cather, Willa Sibert (sī`bərt kăth`ər), 1873–1947, American novelist and short-story writer, b. Winchester, Va., considered one of the great American writers of the 20th cent. When she was nine her family moved to the Nebraska prairie frontier. She graduated from the Univ. of Nebraska in 1895 and worked as a journalist and as a teacher in Pittsburgh. In 1904 she went to New York City. The publication of The Troll Garden (1905), her first collection of short stories, led to her appointment to the editorial staff of McClure's Magazine. She eventually became managing editor and saved the magazine from financial disaster. After the publication of Alexander's Bridge in 1912, she left McClure's and devoted herself to creative writing. For many years she lived quietly in New York City's Greenwich Village. The first of her novels to deal with her major theme is O Pioneers! (1913), a celebration of the strength and courage of the frontier settlers. Other novels with this theme are My Ántonia (1918), One of Ours (1922; Pulitzer Prize), and A Lost Lady (1923). The Song of the Lark (1915) focuses on another of Cather's major preoccupations—the need of artists to free themselves from inhibiting influences, particularly that of a rural or small-town background; the tales collected in Youth and the Bright Medusa (1920) and the novel Lucy Gayheart (1935) also treat this theme. With success and increasing age Cather became convinced that the beliefs and way of life she valued were disappearing. This disillusionment is poignantly evident in her novel The Professor's House (1925). She subsequently turned to North America's far past for her material: to colonial New Mexico in Death Comes for the Archbishop (1927), widely regarded as her masterpiece, and to 17th-century Quebec for Shadows on the Rock (1931), in both novels blending history with religious reverence and loving characterizations. The volumes My Mortal Enemy (1926) and The Old Beauty and Others (1948) present her highly skilled shorter fiction. Her intense interest in the craft of fiction is shown in the essays in Not Under Forty (1936) and On Writing (1949). Cather herself was a master of that craft, her novels and stories written in a pellucid style of great charm and stateliness.

with my pleasure
monamagda
Posted: Thursday, October 12, 2017 10:23:55 AM

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Context from:Not Under Forty

Miss Jewett
I


The best of Miss Jewett’s work, read by a student fifty years from now, will give him the characteristic flavour, the spirit, the cadence, of an American writer of the first order, — and of a New England which will then be a thing of the past.

Even in the stories which fall short of being Miss Jewett’s best, one has the pleasure of her society and companionship — if one likes that sort of companionship. I remember she herself had a fondness for “The Hiltons’ Holiday,” — the slightest of stories: a hard-worked New England farmer takes his two little girls to town, some seventeen miles away (a long drive by wagon), for a treat. That is all, yet the story is a little miracle. It simply IS THE LOOK— shy, kind, a little wistful — which shines out at one from good country faces on remote farms; it is the look ITSELF. To have got it down upon the printed page is like bringing the tenderest of early spring flowers from the deep wood into the hot light of noon without bruising its petals.

To note an artist’s limitations is but to define his talent. A reporter can write equally well about everything that is presented to his view, but a creative writer can do his best only with what lies within the range and character of his deepest sympathies. These stories of Miss Jewett’s have much to do with fisher-folk and seaside villages; with juniper pastures and lonely farms, neat grey country houses and delightful, well-seasoned old men and women. That, when one thinks of it in a flash, is New England. I remember hearing an English actor say that until he made a motor trip through the New England country he had supposed that the Americans killed their aged in some merciful fashion, for he saw none in the cities where he played.

Read more : https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/c/cather/willa/not_under_forty/chapter4.html

Bully_rus
Posted: Thursday, October 12, 2017 2:02:57 PM
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Daemon wrote:
To note an artist's limitations is but to define his talent. A reporter can write equally well about everything that is presented to his view, but a creative writer can do his best only with what lies within the range and character of his deepest sympathies.

Willa Cather (1873-1947)


Yeah. Limitations not only define talent but also give it depth and height...
Verbatim
Posted: Thursday, October 12, 2017 6:18:24 PM
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Daemon wrote:
To note an artist's limitations is but to define his talent. A reporter can write equally well about everything that is presented to his view, but a creative writer can do his best only with what lies within the range and character of his deepest sympathies.

Willa Cather (1873-1947)


Provided that the reporter can view what is presented to his view, and the creative writer chose well
what to view within his deepest sympathies.
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