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My EXPRESSION of the day Options
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 5:53:58 AM
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coag wrote:

9) Asshole (INSULT-EXTREMELY STRONG-USE EXTREME CAUTION IF YOU EVER USE THIS).



I would suggest that one NEVER use that word.

But I have noticed that "A-hole" seems to be less objectionable.

I occasionally hear it on American radio, and it is NOT bleeped out by the censors. (As I understand it, some live programs have a five-second delay so that something can be deleted before it makes it to the air.)
Romany
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 7:10:44 AM
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Indeed - the name for this differs from place to place, country to country. If I'm somewhere I've never been I ask someone what it is they call it - sometimes the answers are rather funny!!
leonAzul
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 4:46:04 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
It is an adjective "half-assed" - it is an idiomatic phrase.
You can't easily change the form.
The noun phrase 'a half ass' does not seem to mean anything.

You don't like how you do things where you work, you should say "Whatever we do, we do in a half assed way."


Or "We never go full on; we can only go half fast."

In a similar vein, "Although our vision was vast, our execution was only half vast."

Whistle


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
leonAzul
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 5:27:20 PM

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Romany wrote:

This might be a word that migrates to other forms of English in time - but is usually regarded, outside of America at least, as 'ghetto'-
The language that brought us 'Mo-fo'. I went for a shufti around the Web and could only find it being used in trashy celebrity mags. or minority niche sites.

It's been around for about a decade but there doesn't seem to be any pick-up in mainstream yet. It's certainly good to know what it means for those who haven't come across it yet. It could be terribly confusing for learners to find it in a magazine article. But unless you're the kind of person who hails people with a "Hey, bruv." and calls your friends 'homies' if you used it right now people would think your English faulty.

(Check back in a couple of years time - it might have become mainstream then!)


That ship has sailed. In American slang, "mo-fo" was the preferred euphemism for a "mother-hubbard" during the 1970s.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Romany
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 5:57:00 PM
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Leon -

I'm actually not at all sure what a mother-hubbard was? I'm wavering between some sort of Army slang for a piece of basic equipment; and a kind of long woman's dress-very like the the Meri-blouse worn in the South Pacific.

(The reason I go for the Army slang option first is because I'm sure I first heard it in re-runs of either Mash or China Beach?

(I liked your phunny little wordplays btw)
coag
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 6:53:34 PM

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Thanks for saying this, Romany. I couldn't figure out the meaning even with the aid of an Internet search. Unless laonAzul didn't want to say mother f****r and said mother-hubbard instead.
coag
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 6:58:09 PM

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Romany wrote:
The language that brought us 'Mo-fo'.

A couple of days ago I ran into the abreviation "mobo". It took me some time to figure out what it meant, regardless to the fact that I was reading an Internet article about computers. Mobo is a short for the (computer) motherboard.
coag
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 7:12:22 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
"Whatever we do, we do in a half assed way."

I found this example in COCA. (My emphasis added)

"Old Johnny Stash had been missing a few weeks. Last anyone heard from him, he was fighting with Brandon Jones over twenty dollars. Brandon did some work around the house for old man Stash. Stash said he did it half-ass and wasn't going to pay him."

The example maybe is not grammatically correct but it's something that someone said. (The question is, was he a native speaker.)
coag
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 7:20:26 PM

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leonAzul wrote:
"We never go full on; we can only go half fast."

In a similar vein, "Although our vision was vast, our execution was only half vast."

Whistle

'ONE of America's great libertarian philosophers, Ron Swanson of the NBC show Parks and Recreation, once counseled a colleague to " never half-ass two things. " # " Whole-ass one thing, " Swanson advised.' (COCA)
leonAzul
Posted: Monday, October 02, 2017 4:20:22 AM

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coag wrote:
Thanks for saying this, Romany. I couldn't figure out the meaning even with the aid of an Internet search. Unless laonAzul didn't want to say mother f****r and said mother-hubbard instead.



Give that man a Kewpie doll.
Applause

I did say that "mo-fo" and "mother-hubbard" were synonyms, didn't I?

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
TheParser
Posted: Monday, October 02, 2017 8:53:34 AM
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No. 26


Mona: Why have you been so blue ( = sad) recently?

Raul: I have just realized ( = discovered) that I won't have enough money to visit my favorite country next year.

Mona: What would you think if I told you that I know an easy and legal way to make $5,000 by the end of this year?

Raul: Really?

Mona: Really!

Raul: I'm all ears. ( = Go ahead and explain how I can make $5,000. I will be listening carefully to every word you say.)

Romany
Posted: Monday, October 02, 2017 10:10:01 AM
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Leon - Ah now I see: I was just being slow on the uptake there!

But still, when not being used euphemistically, there is a thing called a mother-hubbard on which the euphemism was based, isn't there? And I still don't know exactly what it is?
TheParser
Posted: Friday, October 06, 2017 8:47:30 AM
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No. 27


About five years ago, Mona regularly exchanged views online with George.

Mona genuinely thought that George was a prince of a man.

That is, George seemed to be outstanding in every way: intelligent, kind, and generous.

Then something happened, and George changed overnight.

Mona is still broken-hearted.

TheParser
Posted: Saturday, October 07, 2017 7:38:42 AM
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No. 28


Raul: My parents and I had an argument. I left the house without any money and have been walking around the neighborhood for two hours. I'm hungry. Can I have lunch with you?

Mona: Of course. Come on in.

*****

Mona: Here is a delicious bowl of chicken soup.

Raul: I would prefer some vegetable soup, please.

Mona: I don't have any, but here is a nice piece of turkey.

Raul: I would prefer some beef, please.

Mona: I don't have any, but here is a nice dish of broccoli.

Raul: I would prefer carrots, please.

Mona (losing her patience and temper): I offer you chicken soup, but you refuse it; I offer you turkey, but you refuse it; I offer you broccoli, but you refuse it. Since we're good friends, may I be frank (super honest)?

Raul: Of course!

Mona: You came to me and asked for lunch. I really do think that you should accept what I give you.

Raul: I apologize for my bad manners. You are right: Beggars can't be choosers.
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, October 08, 2017 6:44:41 AM
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No. 29


Factory owner: My workers are on strike. They want $100 more a month. I cannot afford to give them that much. What should I do?

Manager: Well, I suggest that you fire (dismiss) the ten leaders of the strike, and then you should give a $25 increase to the other workers. Believe me, they will be happy to keep their jobs and get an extra $25 a month.

Factory owner: Isn't it rather harsh (cruel) to fire those ten workers?

Manager: Yes, it is. But, sadly, sometimes you have to show the power that you have.

Factory owner: I guess you're right. Occasionally, I have to flex my muscles.
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 10:12:03 AM
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No. 30

(In the United States of America, people pay for things in "dollars." In some other countries, they use "pounds.")


Mona: I need a new tire for my car.

Raul: Oh, I can recommend a good tire dealer. I bought a nice new tire there for only $120 last month.

Mona: No way am I going to pay $120 for a tire! My friend tells me that he can get me a retread (an old tire that has been fixed up like new) for only $30.

Raul: As your best friend, I suggest that you not be penny wise, pound foolish.

Mona: Yes, as usual, you are right. If I buy that retread, I might save a few pennies, but if I have an accident using an old tire like that, I might have to spend many dollars (pounds) for medical and legal bills. Can you give me the address of that tire dealer?
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 5:37:47 AM

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Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves.
A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. (Lao Tse)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
TheParser
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 5:52:32 AM
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No. 31


Tom: Look at that guy! He's so fat. Ha, ha, ha.

Betty: I never say unkind things about people who are different from me.

Tom: I apologize.

Nancy: Hey, Betty, do you want to join me and my other friends at that new bar?

Betty: Liquor never touches my lips.

Nancy: I apologize.

Maria: Look, Betty! Here's a picture of our favorite actor in a bikini.

Betty: I never look at such vulgar photos.

Maria: I apologize.

Ralph: STOP IT, BETTY!

Betty: Stop what?

Ralph: Stop telling everyone that you are a goody two-shoes. ( = Someone who is better than others because that person always does what is right, pure, and clean.)
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 11:58:21 AM
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So - I have no idea how the phrase is used in the USA - but for the rest of us a Goody Two-shoes is not an honourable person who lives by the Truth - but a sanctimonious, smug "holier than thou", judgemental person who is a pain in the neck!!
Hope123
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 12:26:30 PM

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Romany wrote:
So - I have no idea how the phrase is used in the USA - but for the rest of us a Goody Two-shoes is not an honourable person who lives by the Truth - but a sanctimonious, smug "holier than thou", judgemental person who is a pain in the neck!!



Same derogatory use here in my neck of the woods.



A smile is a curve that sets everything straight. Phyllis Diller
TheParser
Posted: Friday, October 13, 2017 8:37:36 AM
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No. 32


Mona: Come with me to Mars tomorrow. I have an extra ticket for the spaceship.

Raul: I think I'll stay here on Earth. I've already been there once and had some unpleasant experiences with some Martians. Please do me a big favor, though.

Mona: What?

Raul: Don't tell Tommy what I told you. He would yell at me. He would scream at me. He would cry. He would accuse me of not liking Martians.

Mona: You're right. If Tommy knew why you didn't want to go to Mars, he would have another one of his hissy fits.
coag
Posted: Friday, October 13, 2017 12:43:17 PM

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Thanks for another addition to my vocabulary, TheParser.

My dictionary gives "tantrum" as a synonym for "hissy fit". Interesting, I had seen "tantrum" many times but I had never seen "hissy fit".
tunaafi
Posted: Friday, October 13, 2017 2:47:49 PM

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When I think of tantrums, hissy fits, holier than thou attitudes, and people we might (at times) refer to as goody two-shoes, I think of a certain member of this forum. Because, like him, I am humble, courteous, moderate, fair-minded, middle-of-the-road and hypocritical, I shall not mention his name. Nor shall I mention the date on which he became a member of this forum, or snidely suggest that he was the individual who started this thread. (Oops!)
TheParser
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 4:37:15 AM
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coag wrote:
Thanks for another addition to my vocabulary, TheParser.




You're very welcome.

*****

Several persons have called my attention to the post that follows yours.

They are right: It is a classic example of a hissy fit.





Romany
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 5:06:14 AM
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Now, now, Parsar, don't let your personal feelings get in the way of objective information.

Tuna's post could be described in many, accurate ways - but it is not what one would call a hissy-fit. Your own definition had been that it meant to "to scream, to yell, to cry, to make untrue accusations."

Thus, to anyone trying to learn the language, it's extremely confusing to say that a written post, in which none of the above behaviours are exhibited, is a "classic example".

So you need to explain that either your "scream, yell,cry, accuse" definition is inaccurate, or that your marking of a particular post as an exemplar is inaccurate.

Can't have it both ways - especially for learners trying to understand.
tunaafi
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 5:55:22 AM

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Romany wrote:


Tuna's post could be described in many, accurate ways


'Inappropriate' might be one for that post in this forum. Sorry, I just couldn't resist it at the time. By the time I had second thoughts, I could no longer delete it.
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, October 15, 2017 9:19:00 AM
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No. 33


Joe: What's wrong?

Betty: Next week, all the students are going to vote for "The Most Beautiful Girl at School." I want to win, but I'm afraid that Mona will.

Joe: May I be frank? ( = super honest)

Betty: Of course.

Joe: You are very beautiful, but I think that Mona is more beautiful.

Betty: Maybe that's true, but I still want to win the election. Will you do me a favor?

Joe: What?

Betty: Dig up some dirt on Mona. Then the other students will not vote for her.

Joe: No, Betty, I won't try to discover whether Mona has some embarrassing personal secrets. I have always known you to be a person of good character. It would be wrong to win an election that way.

Betty: You're right! I'm sorry.
almo 1
Posted: Sunday, October 15, 2017 9:23:43 AM
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TheParser wrote:
No. 32





********************


Images of "hissy":










TheParser
Posted: Monday, October 16, 2017 5:32:21 AM
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almo 1 wrote:
TheParser wrote:
No. 32





********************


Images of "hissy":












A picture is indeed worth a thousand words.


Thanks!
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 5:47:36 AM
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No. 33


Mona: George keeps writing letters to the newspaper criticizing your mathematical knowledge. Why haven't you responded to his letters?

Raul: I can't.

Mona: Why not?

Raul: Because of noblesse oblige.

Mona: What in the world does that mean?

Raul: Let's put it this way. Does a king reply to criticism from a subject?

Mona: Of course, not. He's the king. It would be below his dignity to reply to a subject. A king has the duty to be very patient and understanding and forgiving, for he is in a superior position.

Raul: Well ...

Mona: Oh, now I get it. Since you are superior to George at math, it is your moral duty to be very forgiving of George, who everyone knows is horrible at math.

Raul: Now you got it!
tunaafi
Posted: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 6:17:28 AM

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TheParser wrote:
George, who everyone knows is horrible at math.


This speaker of BrE would use hopeless or terrible there. Horrible, which must be OK in AmE sounds unnatural to me. By the way, we Brits also call the subject maths.
TheParser
Posted: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 5:27:30 AM
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No. 34


Mrs. Jones (the principal/head teacher): I have to decide whether to renew Mr. Smith's contract for another year to be a math teacher. I am interested in what you students think.

Mona: Mr. Smith told me I was getting too fat.
Joe: Mr. Smith said I should wear nicer clothes.
Ruth: Mr. Smith said my boyfriend was ugly.
George: Mr. Smith told me I was not intelligent enough for college (the university).
Betty: Mr. Smith told me you were the worst principal that he has ever worked for.


Mrs. Jones: Before I make my decision, would you like to say anything, Raul?

Raul: No, ma'am.

Mrs. Jones: Why not?

Raul: Because I refuse to pile on.

Mona: What does that mean?

Raul: Mr. Smith is like a man who is lying on the ground and being kicked by 5 people. I refuse to be No. 6.
Ursus Minor
Posted: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 5:46:41 AM

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I wouldn't approve of such a way of selecting teachers.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 5:56:03 AM
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I suspect this usage is merely a dialectical usage around where the Parsar lives?

Never having come across it before I looked it up, but couldn't find a definition that fitted the Parsar's. The TFD says: -

1. To leap onto an existing pile of people, especially football players.
2. To add or increase (something, such as criticism) abundantly or excessively.

Thus the sentence: "I refuse to pile on" would, to most people, sound peculiar and unfinished: "I refuse to pile on more criticism" or "I refuse to pile on by jumping on top of a heap of other people" would be expected.

It either means the speaker didn't want to jump on top of another pile of people; or that she didn't wish to add *abundant* &/or *excessive* criticism.

There is no sense at all about whether the criticism is deserved or not; whether it's fair or not; no indication of whether one is taking the person's "side" or point of view. Definitely nothing to do with violence or kicking people.

Hopefully other American posters can add their own understanding of this idiom?
TheParser
Posted: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 7:40:22 AM
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Ursus Minor wrote:
I wouldn't approve of such a way of selecting teachers.



Hi, Ursus Minor:

I guess this answer belongs in the "Culture" forum, but since you raised it here ...

In many American states, teachers in public (government-sponsored) schools have something called "tenure."

They cannot be dismissed except for very serious reasons.

Before tenure, teachers could lose their jobs for political reasons.

Some people are trying to remove tenure.

They want to make it easier to fire teachers if their superiors (and students) feel that they are doing a "bad" job.




Have a nice day!


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