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To draw on Options
Tomahawk71
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 7:40:44 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2010
Posts: 415
Neurons: 122,596
Location: İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
Hi all,
What does "to draw on" mean, please?

QUOTE:

Once you learn to see a certain pattern you can
begin to recognize it everywhere you look. If all living things, for
instance, evolve in fits and starts — the pattern of long periods of
stability interrupted by brief intervals of explosive change usually called
“punctuated equilibrium” — is it any wonder the games humans play
would do the same? Basketball fans, for example, might point to
Julius Irving’s reverse layup during the 1980 NBA playoffs as a defining
moment in the evolution of the game. Hockey fans might argue that
by demonstrating that the greatest acts of athleticism were in what
you did when you didn’t have the puck, Wayne Gretsky turned hockey
into a true team sport.

Serious students of the board game Go can point to
similar instances when a single player resets the table; they just draw
on considerably more history in doing so.
There was the famous “dual
ladder breaker,” move first performed during the Tang dynasty when a
Chinese master scored an upset against a prince visiting from Japan, or
the legendary “ear reddening game” from 1846, in which a single risky
move changed the way people played the game for generations to come.1
Decades might pass between the appearances of these “myoshu” —
moves so “surprising and startling in [their] insight” they achieve a kind
of legendary status.2 It’s all the more remarkable, then, that not one but
two moves that may come to be seen as myoshu were performed in a
high profile match in early March 2016.
tunaafi
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 7:42:21 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2014
Posts: 4,420
Neurons: 53,312
Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
Have you a question for us?
Tomahawk71
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 7:43:09 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2010
Posts: 415
Neurons: 122,596
Location: İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
tunaafi wrote:
Have you a question for us?

Yes, please see my first (and edited) post.
tunaafi
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 8:07:26 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2014
Posts: 4,420
Neurons: 53,312
Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
1 draw on or draw upon -to use something that you have gradually gained or saved

As an actor, you often draw on your own life experiences.
Your body draws on its reserves of fat during the times when you are fasting.


http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/draw-on
tunaafi
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 8:07:27 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2014
Posts: 4,420
Neurons: 53,312
Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
1 draw on or draw upon -to use something that you have gradually gained or saved

As an actor, you often draw on your own life experiences.
Your body draws on its reserves of fat during the times when you are fasting.


http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/draw-on
Tomahawk71
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 11:09:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2010
Posts: 415
Neurons: 122,596
Location: İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
Serious students of the board game Go can point to
similar instances when a single player resets the table; they just RELY on considerably more history in doing so.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 3:07:05 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 15,761
Neurons: 63,007
It might make more sense if you think of 'draw' as an evolution of the word 'drag' - to pull, tug.

Eg a drawer, to withdraw, draw a gun, draw back (retreat), draw out (protract, extend), draw up (stop)
To draw (with a pencil)was originally to pull a marker across a surface.

So, if you see this as 'draw on something' as illustration, that is a red herring! That meaning is a branch off the main tree!


To draw on something is to pull on it,
Eg


Hence metaphorically to draw on something is to pull on it, pull it out (from your memory, from your past), bring it to you, and use it here and now. - the meaning as given in the definition above, and used in that context.
Tomahawk71
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 1:04:18 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2010
Posts: 415
Neurons: 122,596
Location: İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
thar wrote:
It might make more sense if you think of 'draw' as an evolution of the word 'drag' - to pull, tug.

Eg a drawer, to withdraw, draw a gun, draw back (retreat), draw out (protract, extend), draw up (stop)
To draw (with a pencil)was originally to pull a marker across a surface.

So, if you see this as 'draw on something' as illustration, that is a red herring! That meaning is a branch off the main tree!


To draw on something is to pull on it,
Eg


Hence metaphorically to draw on something is to pull on it, pull it out (from your memory, from your past), bring it to you, and use it here and now. - the meaning as given in the definition above, and used in that context.


Thank you, Thar. You made it clear! Thanks!
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